USFWS Tribal Wildlife Grants

Administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Tribal Wildlife Grants program is a competitive grant program available to federally-recognized Indian tribes to conserve fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats. More than $60 million has gone to Native American tribes through the Tribal Wildlife Grants program since 2003, providing support for 350 conservation projects administered by participating Federally-recognized tribes. This wildlife conservation funding includes that for the focal species of Native American cultural or traditional importance, and species that are not hunted or fished. A number of projects funded through the program have focused on climate change impacts on wildlife on tribal lands.

Grant application packages for fiscal year 2018 must be submitted to the appropriate Regional Office no later than September 1, 2017. An estimated 110-130 proposals are expected to be received and about 20-30 awards are expected to be issued for the 2018 funding round.

Example projects that would be eligible for funding may include (but are not limited to):

  • Planning for conservation of fish and wildlife, and their habitats
  • Conservation management actions for fish and wildlife, and their habitats
  • Field and laboratory research related to fish and wildlife resources
  • Natural history studies
  • Fish passage
  • Habitat mapping or evaluation
  • Field surveys and population monitoring
  • Conservation easements
  • Restoration of habitat
  • Management of invasive species
  • Public education relevant to the proposed project

Most funded projects involve habitat protection or restoration that generally is key to supporting wildlife adaptation to climate impacts. Some of the projects that have been funded are specifically climate focused, such as the following:

  • Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians (Wisconsin)- Development of a Comprehensive Climate Change Monitoring Plan for the Kakagon-Bad River Slough (2011 - $199,855)
  • Grand Portage Band of Chippewa Indians (Minnesota) - Moose Habitat Use in a Changing Climate (2009 - $199,999)
  • Newtok Native Village (Alaska) - Development of a Plan to Assess Impact of Climate Change on Nelson Island Wildlife (2011 - $199,736)

 

Publication Date: May 2017

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