All Resources on the Economics of Adaptation

This tab includes all resources on the economics of adaptation in the Adaptation Clearinghouse, including plans addressing economic impacts and reports describing the economic benefits of adaptation actions. Filter this list by sector or impact.

 

 

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Future Flood Losses in Major Coastal Cities

August 2013

This article, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, quantifies present and future flood losses in the world’s largest 136 coastal cities. The researchers conclude that the world’s coastal cities cannot afford to ignore adaptation measures and policies in the face of increasing climate-related flood losses.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Stephane Hallegatte, Colin Green, Robert J. Nicholls, Jan Corfee-Morlot

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Future Sea Level Rise and the New Jersey Coast

June 2005

This study presents an assessment of potential impacts of sea level rise on the New Jersey coast.   Using historical flood data, digital elevation models, and climate change projections, the authors found that sea level rise will submerge 1-3% of coastal lands, and 6. 5-9% of coastal land will be affected by periodic flooding.   The study looks at Cape May Point as a case study for potential impacts on socioeconomic and natural resources that would be relevant to other coastal areas.   Finally, the authors broadly identify a gradual retreat strategy for adaptation.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Matthew J.P. Cooper, Michael D. Beevers, Michael Oppenheimer

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Getting Ahead of the Curve: Corporate Strategies that Address Climate Change

October 2006

This report provides a “how to” guide and six detailed case studies to assist companies in developing a strategy to mitigate climate change related risk. The report also offers perspective on corporate views on greenhouse gas (GHG) regulation, government assistance for technology advancement, and other business related policy issues. Findings are the result of research and best practices from 31 corporations surveyed by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change (now the Center for Energy and Climate Solutions or C2ES).

Author or Affiliated User: Andrew Hoffman

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Launched in 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) is the result of multi-sector, community-based collaboration among federal agencies to protect and restore the Great Lakes system. Members of the GLRI Task Force include the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of the Interior, and the Department of State, among others.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greater Boston, Massachusetts Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

January 2015

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council of Boston (MAPC) released their Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) in 2015, which aims to direct economic development throughout the region until 2020. While the Strategy describes dozens of action items to increase economic resilience, one of the priorities is to address the impacts that climate change will have on Boston’s economy, especially on vulnerable, under-represented communities. The Strategy establishes several goals to increase the City’s economic resilience in the face of climate change and support these frontline communities, including for income inequality within the region to decrease, and that the Metro Area grow a strong supply of skilled and educated workers. In order to achieve these goals, the CEDS recommends several economic development and climate resilience actions to be implemented by policymakers, business owners, local colleges, and more. 

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Baton Rouge–Parish of East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Imagine Plank Road Plan for Equitable Development

June 16, 2022

The Imagine Plank Road: Plan for Equitable Development (plan) is an equitable transit-oriented development (TOD) plan developed to guide revitalization of the Plank Road corridor, an area in north Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parish (parish). Released in November 2019, the plan is a response to historical disinvestment in the Plank Road corridor and addresses issues of infrastructure decay, jobs and commerce, and health and safety. The plan is anchored by a new bus rapid transit (BRT) system that will run along the corridor and connect it to other parts of Baton Rouge. There are seven new developments proposed along the corridor, each designed to provide quality of life amenities and generate tax revenue while preserving local neighborhoods’ history and culture. The Plank Road plan is notable for its goals, metrics, and recommendations for equity-focused community revitalization. At the project level, local policymakers can look to the plan for specific efforts related to urban affordable housing, community-driven development, green infrastructure, and community engagement. More broadly, the plan demonstrates how policymakers can integrate equity across various development initiatives in order to lay a foundation for long-term stability and growth. Build Baton Rouge (BBR) is the lead agency on the plan and took an approach that emphasized community engagement and public-private partnerships in planning and implementation. The Plank Road plan will be implemented concurrently with FUTUREBR, the comprehensive master plan adopted by the parish and the City of Baton Rouge in 2011. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Atlanta, Georgia: Prioritizing Affordable Housing and Nature in the Face of New Growth

June 16, 2022

Because income in Atlanta has not kept pace with rising costs of living amid a population surge, the city has developed several housing initiatives to increase its affordable housing stock and prevent the displacement of existing residents. In 2019, Atlanta released its One Atlanta Affordable Housing Action Plan (plan), a strategic document that includes quantitative goals and policy and program proposals related to building and preserving affordable housing across the city. In the context of managed retreat, Atlanta’s affordable housing efforts have relevance for policymakers in jurisdictions preparing for population growth due to climate change and other causes. The city is implementing a variety of programs and policies to increase the overall housing stock and increase the affordability of homeownership for current residents. These strategies focus on changes to the land-use and zoning code and various financial assistance programs for homeowners, in addition to securing additional resources for the development of affordable rental homes. The city has also engaged in different planning and zoning initiatives around increasing and maintaining green space and tree canopy in both areas targeted for conservation and new, strategic growth. This case study highlights notable initiatives in Atlanta that policymakers in other growing communities can look to when developing their own affordable housing and anti-displacement programs that are aligned with nature. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Austin, Texas: Affordable Housing and Green Infrastructure Efforts

June 16, 2022

Austin’s housing plan and comprehensive plan set forth a vision of the city embodied by sustainability, social equity, and economic opportunity as it prepares for continued growth. To advance these values, Austin is taking an intentional approach to create “complete communities” — compact and connected neighborhoods where daily needs can be met close to where residents live and work. In the realm of affordable housing, this means increasing housing development across the city to maximize access to transit and amenities, rather than keeping affordable housing concentrated in certain areas or isolated on the city’s outskirts. The city’s housing planning is also informed by an environmental element: building affordable housing in compact and connected communities can also reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with traffic congestion and car dependency. On the environmental side, Austin’s various environmental management departments have renewed efforts to collaborate to increase the city’s green infrastructure and update its watershed management plan. These initiatives recognize the need to integrate various programs and agencies in order to establish a more consolidated approach to achieving the city’s environmental goals. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Baton Rouge–Parish of East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Ardendale Master Plan and Guiding Principles

June 16, 2022

The Ardendale Master Plan and Guiding Principles (plan) is a planned community development in the Ardenwood area of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Ardendale consists of 200 acres purchased in 2012 by Build Baton Rouge (BBR), the city’s redevelopment agency. The site currently includes public housing, the automotive technology campus of Baton Rouge Community College, and several acres of wetlands. As proposed under the plan, Ardendale will become a new urbanist community that will include the following types of planned projects: mixed-income affordable housing, infrastructure, quality-of-life amenities, and cohesive landscaping. Specifically, the new vision for Ardendale is to build amenities like housing, businesses, and green space and integrate public access across various community resources to grow socioeconomic resilience. As part of this vision, the plan also includes landscaping design rules that aim to encourage outdoor recreation and community gathering, mitigate natural hazards, and enhance neighborhood aesthetics and culture by using native plants. By balancing community needs and character, the plan demonstrates a multi-faceted and integrated approach to redevelopment that may be illustrative for local policymakers preparing for population growth due to climate change. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Baton Rouge–Parish of East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Scotlandville Community Strategic Plan

June 16, 2022

Between 2019 and 2022, Southern University worked with community partners in Scotlandville, located in north Baton Rouge, to develop a blueprint for improving housing and other socioeconomic outcomes for Scotlandville’s residents. The Scotlandville Community Strategic Plan (Community Plan) is an example of how one Louisiana community has used public participation and community planning to address housing shortages and other challenges in a chronically disinvested community. The Community Plan also helps to highlight the role that universities and other nongovernment institutions can play to develop and implement comprehensive community visions for housing and other services to help increase local resilience. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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