All Resources on the Economics of Adaptation

This tab includes all resources on the economics of adaptation in the Adaptation Clearinghouse, including plans addressing economic impacts and reports describing the economic benefits of adaptation actions. Filter this list by sector or impact.

 

 

435 results are shown below.

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Puget Sound Watershed Management Assistance Program

The Puget Sound is a coastal/inland waterway in Washington state, and is considered to be one of the most ecologically diverse ecosystems in North America. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Puget Sound Watershed Management Assistance Program supports the protection and restoration of Puget Sound aquatic resources in areas threatened by development. These grants are given to local and tribal governments and special purpose districts. The grants support the development of land use management tools to manage and minimize the effects of population and economic growth on water quality and aquatic habitat.

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Resource

National Weather Service Flood Loss Summary Reports

From NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), this website provides annual monetary totals, adjusted to inflation each year, for national flood loss or flood damages. In addition, the website offers quick access to numerous data services provided by the NWS, including forecasts, climate predictions, and current climate observations, among others.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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NOAA Coastal County Snapshots

From NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, this website provides the capability to view flood exposure by county for U. S ocean and Great Lakes coasts. Snapshots detail a county's demographic, infrastructure and environment within the flood zone. The Coastal County Snapshots provide “snapshots” or short reports on the topics of a county’s: Flood Exposure, Ocean Jobs or Wetland Benefits. The snapshots offer county-level facts, and easy-to-understand charts and graphs that describe complex coastal data.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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HUD Community Development Block Grant Program

The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant program (Entitlement Communities Grants and State Program Grants; CFDA Number: 14. 218, 14. 228) is designed to help cities and states provide affordable housing and expand economic opportunities; CDBG funds must go to principally benefit persons of low and moderate income.  The CDBG program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs.

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Capital Region Business Resiliency Initiative and Toolkit (Sacramento, California)

The Business Resiliency Initiative (BRI) was launched in the Sacramento Capital Region of California to increase awareness and preparedness for continuity risks faced by small and medium businesses. The Initiative aims to minimize the impacts of an economic crisis potentially caused by unforeseen disaster - recognizing the increase in frequency and severity of extreme weather events and climate change related impacts such as fire, flood, drought and storms. The project is built around designing an effective regional resiliency framework that can be replicated across the country.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Greenhouse Effect, Sea Level Rise and Barrier Islands: Case Study of Long Beach Island, New Jersey

1990

Published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1990, this article discusses the likely impacts of future sea level rise on developed barrier islands, and provides a case study of Long Beach Island, New Jersey. 

Author or Affiliated User: James Titus

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Metropolitan East Coast Regional Assessment: Risk Increase to Infrastructure Due to Sea Level Rise

2000

A sub-set of the "2000 Metropolitan East Coast Assessment" from Columbia University, this report provides an assessment of the risks to transportation infrastructure from sea-level rise in the tri-state area surrounding New York City (encompassing parts of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut).

Authors or Affiliated Users: Klaus H. Jacob, Noah Edelblum, Jonathan Arnold

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Sea Level Rise and Global Climate Change: A Review of Impacts to U.S. Coasts

February 2000

This early report, published by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change (now Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, C2ES), describes the threat that sea level rise poses, and identifies the specific types of impacts this phenomenon will likely have. The state of understanding of the impacts on U.S. coasts is reviewed, and impacts described include inundation of wetlands and lowlands, coastal erosion, increased vulnerability to flooding, and salinization of the water supply. 

Authors or Affiliated Users: James E. Neumann, Gary Yohe, Robert Nicholls, Michelle Manion

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Cool Surfaces and Shade Trees to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Air Quality in Urban Areas

2001

This article, published in Elsevier in 2002, outlines how cool surfaces (cool roofs and cool pavements) and urban trees can have a substantial effect on urban air temperature and, hence, can reduce cooling-energy use and smog. Using a dozen metropolitan cities as case studies, this paper demonstrates an estimate of about 20% of the national cooling demand can be avoided through a large-scale implementation of heat-island mitigation measures. This amounts to 40 TWh/ year savings, worth over $4B per year by 2015, in cooling-electricity savings alone.

Authors or Affiliated Users: H. Akbari, M. Pomerantz, H. Taha

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Confronting Climate Change in the Gulf Coast Region: Prospects for Sustaining Our Ecological Heritage

October 2001

This report from the Union of Concerned Scientists and the Ecological Society of America explores the potential risks of climate change to Gulf Coast ecosystems in the context of pressures from land use. Its purpose is to help the public and policymakers understand the most likely ecological consequences of climate change in the region over the next 50 to 100 years, and prepare to safeguard the economy, culture, and natural heritage of the Gulf Coast.

Authors or Affiliated Users: R.R. Twilley, E.J. Barron, H.L. Gholz, M.A. Harwell, R.L. Miller, D.J. Reed, J.B. Rose, E.H. Siemann, R.G. Wetzel, R.J. Zimmerman

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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