All Resources on the Economics of Adaptation

This tab includes all resources on the economics of adaptation in the Adaptation Clearinghouse, including plans addressing economic impacts and reports describing the economic benefits of adaptation actions. Filter this list by sector or impact.

 

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Baton Rouge–Parish of East Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Scotlandville Community Strategic Plan

June 16, 2022

Between 2019 and 2022, Southern University worked with community partners in Scotlandville, located in north Baton Rouge, to develop a blueprint for improving housing and other socioeconomic outcomes for Scotlandville’s residents. The Scotlandville Community Strategic Plan (Community Plan) is an example of how one Louisiana community has used public participation and community planning to address housing shortages and other challenges in a chronically disinvested community. The Community Plan also helps to highlight the role that universities and other nongovernment institutions can play to develop and implement comprehensive community visions for housing and other services to help increase local resilience. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Charlotte, North Carolina: Pilot Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing (NOAH) Subsidy Program

June 16, 2022

The City of Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the country, and where the price of housing has increased exponentially in recent years. Like many large urban centers, Charlotte faces challenges in meeting the demands for affordable and available housing. In 2020, the Charlotte City Council adopted the Pilot Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing (NOAH) Rental Subsidy Program (“Pilot NOAH Program”) to help preserve some of the city’s over 20,000 units of housing that are considered naturally affordable, i.e., without the assistance of government subsidies. Under the Pilot NOAH Program, the city provides financial assistance to private developers who agree to keep the units affordable rather than rebuild them or raise rent, which may lead to the displacement of current residents. Working in tandem with private investors who help subsidize the initial acquisition of NOAH properties, the Pilot NOAH Program has been created to help preserve the city’s affordable housing stock. The preservation of NOAH housing is one component of Charlotte’s broader strategy for preserving and creating affordable housing for low-and moderate-income residents, and can be illustrative for cities that seek to leverage additional public-private partnerships to improve housing affordability and availability in their jurisdictions. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Richmond, Virginia: Maggie Walker Community Land Trust and Richmond Land Bank

June 16, 2022

The Maggie Walker Community Land Trust (MWCLT) in Richmond, Virginia, is the first community land trust (CLT) in the nation to be designated a land bank, the Richmond Land Bank. In creating the Richmond Land Bank in 2018 — via a formal Memorandum of Agreement with MWCLT —  the City of Richmond merged two separate yet complementary mechanisms for expanding affordable home ownership opportunities for low-and-moderate income residents: a land bank, which acquires and sells vacant, abandoned, and deteriorated properties; and a CLT, which conveys permanently affordable housing to residents in need. As of spring 2022, the Richmond Land Bank is the only formalized land bank and CLT partnership in the country. The land bank, which operates as a program under MWCLT, is one of three MWCLT initiatives working to produce permanently affordable housing in the Richmond metropolitan area. The Richmond Land Bank illustrates an emerging approach of combining two existing types of mechanisms to produce additional affordable housing options for low-and-moderate income residents, preserving community control over developable land, and collaborating with local stakeholders to integrate environmental and adaptation benefits in affordable housing development. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Portland, Oregon: Planning and Zoning for Manufactured Housing Communities

June 16, 2022

In recent years, Portland, Oregon has experienced rapid population growth and demographic shifts, resulting in changing housing dynamics — most notably, a decrease in affordable housing. Manufactured Housing Communities (MHC) or manufactured homes, known also as “mobile homes” or “trailers” are a valuable source of unsubsidized affordable housing for thousands of households in Portland. This form of housing is, however, threatened by the effects of climate change and development pressures. In order to preserve MHC across the city, a campaign to change Portland’s comprehensive plan and zoning laws, led by the community-based organization Living Cully, resulted in amendments to the City of Portland’s comprehensive plan and the creation of the Manufactured Dwelling Park Zone in 2018. The Manufactured Dwelling Park Zone is a new base district that covers all existing MHC in Portland, precluding any other commercial or residential use on the properties and effectively protecting these communities and their residents from park closures. Portland has become a leader in MHC policy and can serve as an example for other cities looking to expand and protect their affordable housing options. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — Town of Washington, Virginia: Rush River Commons Mixed-Use Development

June 16, 2022

The Town of Washington, Virginia is a small rural town that largely benefits from the service and tourism industries. Initially funded by private citizen Chuck Akre, Rush River Commons is a project of the Sherwood Fund, the Akre family’s operating foundation. Rush River Commons is a proposed mixed-use development project for the Town of Washington. The project prioritizes the historic character of the Washington community and respects the surrounding natural environment. The proposed plan includes building a community center, office space for nonprofits, and affordable rental housing on a nine-acre property located in the town. The project also includes a plan for restoring the land’s natural wetlands and amenities. Construction of Rush River Commons is set to begin in early 2022. The Rush River Commons project shows how mixed-use development can be designed in a way that is compatible with rural communities. It is also a good example of how local policymakers can help create comprehensive plans and ordinances that support both public and private affordable housing ventures. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

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