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FloodHelpNY - New York City, New York

2016

The Center for NYC Neighborhoods and the Governor's Office of Storm Recovery in New York launched an $8 million resiliency program in New York City for low- and moderate-income homeowners in 2016. To support this program, they created a free interactive website which provides NYC homeowners with personalized information on flood risks and flood insurance rates. One goal of the program is to connect low- and middle-income homeowners with engineers in select coastal communities to provide resiliency audits so they can reduce their risk to future floods and lower their insurance rates.

Related Organizations: Center for NYC Neighborhoods

Resource Category: Adaptation Websites

 

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The Prevalence and Cost of Urban Flooding

May 2014

Investigating Cook County, Illinois as a case study, this report assesses the financial cost related to urban flooding between 2007-2011.  Urban flooding as described here can include overflow from rivers and streams, sewage pipe backups, water seepage through building walls and floors, and stormwater accumulation. Cook County is primarily urban and densely populated with the City of Chicago making up approximately 54% of the population. The study found that urban flooding is chronic and often repetitive in this county, costing a total of $773 million in insurance claims over five years.

Related Organizations: Center for Neighborhood Technology, RainReady

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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The Impact of Climate Change and Population Growth on the National Flood Insurance Program Through 2100

June 12, 2013

This report prepared by AECOM was commissioned by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to analyze potential long-term effects of  climate change on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Through this study, FEMA hopes to understand the potential impact of climate change on the financial strength of the NFIP, and recommend options to increase the NFIP’s viability. The climate change impact assessment includes all 50 states, as well as consideration of the U. S. territories, where attention was given primarily to areas of greatest population and the largest inventory of at-risk properties.

Related Organizations: Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Future Flood Losses in Major Coastal Cities

August 2013

This article, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, quantifies present and future flood losses in the world’s largest 136 coastal cities. The researchers conclude that the world’s coastal cities cannot afford to ignore adaptation measures and policies in the face of increasing climate-related flood losses.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Stephane Hallegatte, Colin Green, Robert J. Nicholls, Jan Corfee-Morlot

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Homeowners' Insurance Changes in Coastal Virginia: Causes and consequences for shoreline communities

July 2013

This study reviews the extent to which the private insurance industry may influence adaptation to climate change along Virginia’s tidal shoreline through homeowners insurance. Homeowners insurance is becoming more costly along the Atlantic Coast and coverage is changing, especially for wind damage. This year-long study by Wetlands Watch explored the private sector perceptions on sea level rise and climate adaptation, examines the specific drivers behind increasing insurance rates, and provides plausible adaptive actions in response to these increasing rates.

Related Organizations: Wetlands Watch

Authors or Affiliated Users: Skip Stiles, Shannon Hulst

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia – Transportation Impacts

January 14, 2013

This study makes projections for recurrent flooding in coastal Virginia, outlines the predicted impacts on transportation infrastructure, and offers planning and implementation activities to reduce risks to coastal infrastructure. The report provides an overview of available adaptation strategies for recurrent flooding, reviews their implementation around the world, and identifies specific strategies appropriate for Virginia.

Related Organizations: Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Molly Mitchell, Carl Hershner, Julie Herman, Dan Schatt, Pam Mason, Emily Eggington

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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VIMS Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia

January 14, 2013

In March 2012, the Virginia Legislature passed House Joint Resolution No. 50, which directed the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) to study the impacts of recurrent flooding in Tidewater and the Eastern Shore, and to identify adaptation strategies. The Recurrent Flooding Study makes projections for recurrent flooding due to sea-level rise, storm surge, and heavy rainfall, addressing all localities in Virginia's coastal zone.

Related Organizations: Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) Center for Coastal Resources Management

Authors or Affiliated Users: Molly Mitchell, Carl Hershner, Julie Herman, Dan Schatt, Pam Mason, Emily Eggington

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Costs of Defending Against Rising Sea Levels and Flooding in Mid-Atlantic Metropolitan Coastal Areas

2010

This assessment identifies the potential costs of continually rising ocean levels and associated flooding, specifically on the mid-Atlantic Coast.  Metropolitan areas are susceptible to detriment on many levels, such as severe property damage and loss of natural resources, from sea level rise and related inundation and extreme weather events. This paper addresses what it would cost to minimize or eliminate such damage.

Related Organizations: Old Dominion University

Author or Affiliated User: James V. Koch

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Assessing the Risk of 100-Year Freshwater Floods in the Lamprey River Watershed of New Hampshire Resulting from Changes in Climate and Land Use

2010

This NOAA funded project is assessing flood risk associated with existing and future land use and climate change scenarios for the Lamprey River watershed of Great Bay, New Hampshire to support land use decision-making. Key products include maps at the watershed and municipality scale of the 100-year flood risk boundaries and river discharge at specific locations under selected land use and climate change scenarios.

Related Organizations: University of New Hampshire

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Mapping Urban Risk: Flood Hazards, Race, and Environmental Justice in New York

January 1, 2009

This paper applies a more nuanced method for mapping population data to estimate the number of people potentially impacted by flood hazards in New York City.  The authors find that the number of people living in the floodplain in New York City is undercounted by traditional mapping methods by 37-72% compared to their method, and that this undercounting was not evenly spread across racial and ethnic groups. The paper also provides a literature review that outlines: why and how various groups of people may be impacted differently by the same disaster event, a review of environmental justice more broadly, and an overview of flood hazards in the U.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Juliana Mantaay, Andrew Maroko

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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