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Patterns and Projections of High Tide Flooding Along the U.S. Coastline Using a Common Impact Threshold

February 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) analyzes "high tide flooding" (also known as "nuisance flooding") in this report, and finds that it is becoming more commonplace due to sea level rise. High tide flooding impacts roads, beaches, parks, and private property, and is generally more disruptive than damaging. However, there are places such as Norfolk, Virginia; San Diego, California; and the U. S Marshall islands where it is currently a serious problem. Even more, with continued sea level rise, flooding is likely to increase.

Authors or Affiliated Users: William Sweet, Greg Dusek, Jayantha Obeysekera, John Marra

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Building a Better Norfolk: A Zoning Ordinance of the 21st Century - Norfolk, Virginia

January 23, 2018

The City of Norfolk, Virginia adopted a new zoning ordinance in 2018 to enhance flood resilience and direct new more intense development to higher ground. The ordinance establishes a Coastal Resilience Overlay (CRO) zone, where new development and redevelopment will have to comply with new flood resilience requirements, and an Upland Resilience Overlay (URO), designed to encourage new development in areas of the city with lower risk of flooding.

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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New Hampshire’s Climate Risk in the Seacoast (C-RiSe) Project

New Hampshire’s Department of Environmental Services administers the Climate Risk in the Seacoast (C-RiSe) project which is intended to provide municipalities along the Great Bay with the resources they need to assess sea level rise and storm surge flooding. The Great Bay communities that have been assessed include: Rollinsford, Dover, Madbury, Durham, Newmarket, Newfields, Exeter, Stratham, Greenland, and Newington. This project is funded through the Coastal Zone Management Act by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Hawaii Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation Report

December 29, 2017

Hawaii’s Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation Report was initially mandated by the Hawaii Climate Change Adaptation Initiative (Act 83, 2014, and expanded by Act 32, 2017). This report represents the first state-wide vulnerability assessment for sea level rise (SLR) coastal hazards in Hawaii.  Statewide and island specific adaptation recommendations are given to help reduce Hawaii’s exposure to sea level rise and increase coastal hazard resilience.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Building Ecological Solutions to Coastal Community Hazards – A Guide for New Jersey Coastal Communities

December 13, 2017

From the National Wildlife Federation and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, this report outlines ecological or nature-based solutions to prepare for and adapt to hazards in New Jersey coastal communities. It describes measures to protect open space, enhance and protect coastal ecosystems (including beaches and dunes, coastal forests and shrublands, and tidal marshes) in ways that increase elevation and reduce erosion and flooding risks.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Washington Shoreline Master Program Handbook: Appendix A – Addressing Sea Level Rise in Shoreline Master Programs

December 2017 Revision

The Shoreline Master Programs Handbook, developed by Washington Department of Ecology, provides guidance to help local governments meet the requirements of the Shoreline Management Act (RCW 90.58) and the Shoreline Master Program Guidelines (WAC 173-26, Part III). Appendix A of the Handbook directs planners on how to incorporate sea level rise planning into the broader framework of shoreline management planning.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Great Marsh Coastal Adaptation Plan

December 2017

The National Wildlife Federation, in partnership with the Ipswich River Watershed Association, developed this adaptation plan for six coastal communities in northeastern Massachusetts (Salisbury, Newbury, Newburyport, Essex, Ipswich, and Rowley) that are in the Great Marsh and highly vulnerable to climate change. The report includes thorough reviews of vulnerability assessments of current and future coastal climate threats for the region and for each town. Near and long-term strategies that reduce risk and increase ecosystem and community resiliency are described for each of the six communities and regionally as well.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Taj Schottland, Christopher Hilke

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Carlsbad, California Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment

December 2017

This report from the City of Carlsbad, California - located along the state’s southern coast - evaluates the magnitude and likelihood of impacts due to sea level rise and coastal hazards on city assets. The report considers damage to assets from flooding and erosion based on sea level rise scenarios through 2050 and 2100. Vulnerability ratings are given by asset type, along with recommended adaptation strategies to inform planning, decision-making, and the city’s Local Coastal Program and Zoning Ordinance.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Case Studies of Natural Shoreline Infrastructure in Coastal California

November 27, 2017

This report describes natural infrastructure projects implemented in coastal California to support adaptive planning and solutions regarding climate-related coastal hazards. Five case studies of successful adaptation projects to address coastal issues are provided, demonstrating different strategies for varying coastal environments. The report makes the case that natural shoreline infrastructure is a better alternative to engineered structures such as seawalls that increase erosion. Natural infrastructure is more likely to preserve the benefits of coastal ecosystems which provide flood protection, recreation, wildlife habitat, water quality and more.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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New York Tidal Wetlands Guidance Document

November 22, 2017

From the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), this document offers guidance on permitting requirements for public or private living shorelines projects in the Marine and Coastal District Waters of New York (Lower Hudson River to the tip of Long Island).  Intended for permitting staff, design professionals, and property owners, this guidance encourages living shorelines over other hardening approaches for flood and erosion control and promotes consistent permit determination for living shoreline projects.

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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