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U.S. Department of Transportation's Gulf Coast Study

January 2015

The U.S. Department of Transportation conducted the Gulf Coast Study to better understand the range of potential climate change impacts on transportation infrastructure and identify possible strategies for adapting infrastructure. It was conducted in two major phases, starting with Phase 1 (completed in 2008), and ending with the completion of Phase 2 in 2015.

Related Organizations: U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) Engineering Department Manual - Climate Resilience Design Guidelines

January 22, 2015

The Engineering Department of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) produced the Climate Resilience Design Guidelines (guidelines) to ensure that new agency infrastructure and buildings are designed to account for projected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level.  PANYNJ project architects and engineers are to use the guidelines to assess the vulnerability of projects to future impacts and to address those impacts when designing port authority infrastructure and buildings.

Related Organizations: The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Central Texas Extreme Weather and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment of Regional Transportation Infrastructure

January 2015

Led by the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) and the City of Austin, this assessment is one of 19 national projects funded by the Federal Highway Administration to pilot approaches to conduct climate change and extreme weather vulnerability assessments of transportation infrastructure, and to analyze options for adapting and improving resiliency. Using the Department of Transportation’s Vulnerability Assessment Scoring Tool, the report evaluates the vulnerability of nine critical transportation assets – including Austin’s MetroRail Red Line and interstate highways – to climate stressors such as flooding, drought, extreme heat, wildfire, and icing.

Related Organizations: Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO), City of Austin Office of Sustainability

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice (Focus Area 7: Integrate Transportation and Land Use Decision-Making – Climate Change Resilience and Long-Range Planning Section)

January 2015

“The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice,” developed by the State Smart Transportation Initiative and Smart Growth America, contains a resiliency section that provides guidance for state departments of transportation (DOTs) on how to incorporate climate change adaptation into long-range transportation planning. It provides state DOTs with a comprehensive list of reforms that will address potential climate-related vulnerabilities and reduce the likelihood, magnitude, duration and cost of disruption associated with extreme weather.

Related Organizations: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Piedras Blancas Highway 1 Realignment - Caltrans/San Luis Obispo

2015

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is planning to realign a 2. 8 mile section of iconic Highway 1 to address current and anticipated impacts from coastal erosion and storm surge.  This section of Highway 1, which is north of the Piedras Blancas Lighthouse in San Luis Obispo County, is already experiencing increased storm damage from flooding and erosion, and these impacts are projected to increase with rising sea levels and higher storm surge caused by climate change.  Realigning the highway away from the coast will reduce its vulnerability to current damage as well as to future climate impacts and will protect the highway from bluff retreat for the next 100 years.

Related Organizations: California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Toward Sustainable Pavement Systems: A Reference Document

January 2015

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) guide, “Toward Sustainable Pavement Systems: A Reference Document,” synthesizes current knowledge on pavement system sustainability, including the effects that pavement has on climate-related considerations such as stormwater runoff and the urban heat island effect. The guide includes information and extensive synopses of current research on how pavement materials, design, construction, maintenance, and other use considerations can affect and enhance sustainability.

Related Organizations: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Central New Mexico Climate Change Scenario Planning Project and Long Range Metropolitan Transportation Plan

2015

The Mid-Region Council of Governments of New Mexico (MRCOG) is integrating climate change analysis into long-range transportation and land use planning through the Central New Mexico Climate Change Scenario Planning Project. MRCOG partnered with federal land management agencies, the U. S. Department of Transportation Volpe Center, and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to plan for a regional reduction in future greenhouse gas emissions, and to prepare for the potential impacts of climate change.

Related Organizations: John A. Volpe National Transportation System Center, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Park Service (NPS)

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Washington, DC Flood Levee System Improvements

December 2014

To prevent water from the Potomac and Anacostia rivers from flooding downtown Washington, D. C. , the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is improving the levee system along the north side of the National Mall, running from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument.   A levee system was originally erected to protect the District in 1939, following a major flood event in 1936.   This project will improve the levee system through a series of upgrades: a permanent closure at 23rd Street and Fort McNair, and the installation of a more robust removable wall, which will provide flood protection but also allow for traffic flow on 17th street between flood events.

Related Organizations: National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC), District of Columbia Department of Transportation, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), National Park Service (NPS)

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Options Study for Oregon

December 2014

In 2014 the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) completed a study which assessed the vulnerability of the state’s transportation infrastructure to climate change and natural disasters. The Federal Highway Administration sponsored the report as part of a its Climate Change Resilience Pilot Program which assessed climate impacts for a number of states' transportation systems, and developed feasible adaptation strategies. As part of Oregon’s case study, ODOT, whose Adaptation Work Group provided guidance throughout the process, developed new sea level rise maps, collected baseline data, and used a case study to learn from existing coastal hazard mitigation projects - all of which are detailed in the report.

Related Organizations: Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT)

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Capitol Corridor (CA) Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment and 2014 Vision Plan Update

November 19, 2014

The Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority (CCJPA) conducted a sea-level rise vulnerability assessment for the corridor’s rail assets and is incorporating those findings into the agency’s Vision Plan, identifying sea-level rise as a critical issue in long-term planning and investments. The Capitol Corridor, which is managed but not owned by the CCJPA, serves as the primary public transportation connection between the Sacramento metropolitan area and the San Francisco Bay Area. Large stretches of the corridor run along waterfronts and through marshlands and other areas that will be increasingly vulnerable to inundation and flooding during storm events as sea levels rise.

Related Organizations: Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority

Resource Category: Planning

 

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