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National Integrated Heat Health Information System - Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign

2018

The National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign provides technical and financial support to urban areas to help them identify neighborhoods at greatest risk from heat stress. NIHHIS is an integrated system that develops science-based products and services for urban areas to understand and reduce health risks related to extreme heat, which is likely to increase in frequency and severity in many urban areas as a result of climate change. Cities receive training, loaned equipment, and data processing and other technical support through the Mapping Campaign. Once complete, each participating city has detailed heat distribution data and maps, as well as a final report detailing the work and findings. NOAA is currently accepting city applications for the 2021 Mapping Campaign. Applications are accepted through 5pm ET on January 8, 2021.

Related Organizations: NOAA Climate Program Office, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Resource Category: Funding

 

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New Jersey Payment-in-Lieu-of-Taxes (PILOT) Program

In 1971, New Jersey implemented the Payment-in-Lieu-of-Taxes (PILOT) Program. Through this program, the state pays municipalities to protect and conserve open, undeveloped lands owned by the state and tax-exempt nonprofit organizations. This program was created to benefit environmental quality, quality of life, and economic health in New Jersey by conserving open space for natural resources and recreational purposes. While this program has been amended throughout its tenure, it is a noteworthy example of a state program that creates incentives for local governments to create open space by mitigating the impacts of lost tax revenue and land maintenance costs. In a managed retreat context, a similar program could be coupled with hazard mitigation buyouts and open space acquisitions to encourage local governments to conserve vulnerable properties impacted by sea-level rise and flooding. 

Related Organizations: State of New Jersey

Resource Category: Funding

 

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New York Community Risk and Resiliency Act Implementation Guidance

November 4, 2020

In November 2020, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) released a series of four guidance documents to implement part of the New York Community Risk and Resiliency Act (CRRA), as amended by the New York State Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA). The CRRA requires that state agencies consider future climate impacts as a part of certain planning, permitting, and funding actions. The CRRA also requires that the DEC issue guidance for state agencies and other audiences to implement the CRRA. In accordance with that requirement, DEC issued four guidance documents: (1) Using Natural Measures to Reduce the Risk of Flooding and Erosion, which describes natural resilience measures and their uses for reducing risks associated with erosion and flooding; (2) New York State Flood Risk Management Guidance, which presents recommendations to state agencies on considering flood risk in planning and project implementation; (3) a guide on Estimating Guideline Elevations, which presents the principles introduced in the New York State Flood Risk Management Guidance to assist planners, engineers, designers, and architects in flood mitigation project design; and (4) Guidance for Smart Growth Public Infrastructure Assessment, which provides general principles of climate risk mitigation that state agencies should follow when undertaking "smart growth assessments" required by the CRRA and other state statutes. While these guidance documents were developed by DEC to facilitate implementation of the New York Community Risk and Resiliency Act, much of the information presented is applicable to other jurisdictions that seek to manage floodplains in accordance with climate risks.

Related Organizations: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Understanding Solar + Storage: Answers to Commonly Asked Questions About Solar PV and Battery Storage

October 2020

This guide from Clean Energy Group (CEG) answers twelve of the most common questions surrounding solar+storage. Topics include the cost and value of a solar+storage system, the benefits of the system, and common factors to consider when designing and installing such a system. By addressing these questions, this guide aims to serve as a starting point for individuals and organizations interested in exploring solar+storage for their homes, businesses, and community facilities. The guide was produced under the Resilient Power Project, a joint project of CEG and the Meridian Institute, which work to accelerate the market development of resilient, clean energy solutions in low-income and underserved communities.

Related Organizations: Clean Energy Group

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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Greening in Place: Protecting Communities from Displacement

October 2020

The Greening in Place guide serves to assist public agencies and developers in pursuing equitable green development and combating the displacement impacts that green investments can invoke. It includes an assessment of the displacement risks associated with green investment, a framework for equitable green development, several case studies, and a range of policies and strategies that can be used in partnership with the affected communities. By pursuing these strategies, park agencies and community advocates can advance racial and economic equity and promote healthy, sustainable, and inclusive green development.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework

In October 2020, the Commonwealth of Virginia published the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework (Framework), which presents the Commonwealth's strategy for implementing coastal protection and adaptation measures to increase the flood resilience of coastal communities and economies. The Framework presents the core principles of the Commonwealth's approach to coastal adaptation and protection and describes how Virginia will develop and implement its first Coastal Resilience Master Plan (Master Plan) by the end of 2021.

Related Organizations: State of Virginia

Resource Category: Planning

 

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South Carolina Disaster Relief and Resilience Act

September 29, 2020

In September 2020, the South Carolina legislature passed the Disaster Relief and Resilience Act ("the act," S. B. 259, codified at S. C. Code Ann. §§ 48-62-10, 48-62-310, 6-29-510(D)) to increase the state's resilience to natural disaster and flooding events. The act establishes the position of Chief Resilience Officer and the South Carolina Office of Resilience to coordinate disaster recovery and resilience efforts within the state, creates the Disaster Relief and Resilience Reserve Fund to finance disaster recovery efforts and hazard mitigation projects, and creates the Resilience Revolving Fund to provide low-interest loans to local governments to perform floodplain buyouts and restoration.

Related Organizations: State of South Carolina

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Adaptokc: Adapting for a Healthy Future - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

July 2020

Adaptokc, the first sustainability plan for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was adopted by the city’s Planning Commission and City Council in summer 2020. Adaptokc aims to strengthen Oklahoma City communities in the face of economic, social, and environmental challenges -- including climate change. The plan is divided up into four main sections: energy productivity, natural and built environment, air quality, and waste reduction. Among the initiatives proposed in the plan are increased energy efficiency and renewable energy use, mitigation of heat through development requirements, reduced transportation emissions, reduced waste generation, and strengthening of infrastructure against extreme weather.

Related Organizations: City of Oklahoma City

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Vermont Global Warming Solutions Act

In September 2020, the Vermont State Legislature passed the Vermont Global Warming Solutions Act (H.688), which requires the state to pursue climate solutions that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and support environmental and economic resilience. Specifically, the act transforms Vermont's existing GHG emission reduction goals into legal requirements and orders the development of the state’s first Climate Action Plan to identify strategies to reduce state GHG emissions, build healthy and resilient communities, and adapt to Vermont's already-changing climate. Notably, the act includes a provision that allows private citizens to bring a lawsuit against the state government upon the state's failure to adopt or update any rules necessary to implement the Climate Action Plan, including for failure to promulgate rules necessary to implement adaptation or resilience actions, in order to require the state to comply with the act. The act also has a noteworthy focus on equity and ensuring that resilience building programs are accessible to rural, low-income, and marginalized communities. 

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Community Land Trust Brussels, Belgium

December 7, 2020

The Brussels Community Land Trust (CLTB) focuses on providing affordable housing for the most at-risk populations in the capital region of Belgium, such as low-income workers, immigrants, single mothers, seniors and people with disabilities. CLTB focuses on developing multi-family apartment buildings; it has constructed three projects with 48 units and has seven other projects under construction or study that would deliver more than 120 units. It is building highly energy efficient “net zero” housing developments that conform to sustainability requirements established by the Brussels-Capital Region. Several CLTB projects are also incorporating other green design features, such as green roofs, public gardens, and other community spaces to enhance both the environmental and social benefits of the project. It is exploring opportunities to build local energy cooperatives, to leverage incentives to build housing powered by renewable energy sources, and to shift development patterns to enhance access to transit and shift mobility patterns to emphasize biking and walking. CLTB is also working to develop “social economy hubs” in its projects to provide business incubation opportunities for the neighborhood and to support local job creation. For example, one of their development sites had old warehouses and rather than tear those buildings down immediately, CLTB worked with residents to organize temporary uses on the site including pop-up restaurants, cooking classes, and incubation of a catering business.

Author or Affiliated User: Jessica Grannis

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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