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A Discussion of the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on the Shorelines of the Northeastern USA

July 10, 2007

This report, prepared for the 2007 Northeast Climate Impact Assessment (see separate entry), provides a broad overview of how sea-level rise will impact the coast of the northeastern United States. Different possible rates of sea-level rise and the primary impact of shoreline retreat is discussed. The report explains how local features determine the extent of shoreline retreat in a given area and addresses how sea-level rise could affect different ecosystems, including estuaries, salt marshes, and barrier island systems.

Related Organizations: Woods Hole Sea Grant, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Andrew D. Ashton, Jeffrey P. Donnelly, Rob L. Evans

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Sea-Level Rise and Coastal Habitats in the Pacific Northwest: An Analysis for Puget Sound, Southwestern Washington, and Northwestern Oregon

July 2007

This report, by the National Wildlife Federation, documents results from a study on the projected impacts of sea-level rise to key coastal habitats in the Pacific Northwest. The study modeled sea-level rise up to 2 meters, based on input from prior studies, and examined its effects including the inundation of estuarine beaches, loss of tidal flats and marshes, and the inundation of inland swamps. The report also provides a brief description of how these effects will impact wildlife. Finally, the report makes one broad recommendation for planners to account for sea-level rise in their habitat restoration projects.

Related Organizations: National Wildlife Federation

Authors or Affiliated Users: Patty Glick, Jonathan Clough, Brad Nunley

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Estimating Future Costs for Alaska Public Infrastructure at Risk from Climate Change

June 2007

The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska Anchorage created a model to estimate how much climate change could add to the costs of maintaining public infrastructure in Alaska in the near future (by 2030). This report describes how that model was developed, and presents preliminary estimates of additional public infrastructure costs resulting from climate change. The report concludes that a changing climate could make it 10 to 20 percent more expensive to build and maintain infrastructure, and that climate change induced damages could add $3.

Related Organizations: University of Alaska Anchorage, Institute of Social and Economic Research (University of Alaska-Anchorage)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Peter Larsen, Scott Goldsmith, Orson Smith, Meghan Wilson, Ken Strzepek, Paul Chinowsky, Ben Saylor

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: Preliminary Results for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Coast

2000

In this report, the relative vulnerability (the Coastal Vulnerability Index, or CVI) of different coastal environments to sea-level rise is quantified for the U. S. Gulf of Mexico Coast region. This initial classification is based upon variables such as coastal geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of sea-level rise, wave and tide characteristics, and historical shoreline change rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnishes a broad overview of sub-regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.

Related Organizations: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Authors or Affiliated Users: E. Robert Thieler, Erika S. Hammar-Klose

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Metropolitan East Coast Regional Assessment: Risk Increase to Infrastructure Due to Sea Level Rise

2000

A sub-set of the "2000 Metropolitan East Coast Assessment" from Columbia University, this report provides an assessment of the risks to transportation infrastructure from sea-level rise in the tri-state area surrounding New York City (encompassing parts of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut).

Related Organizations: Metropolitan East Coast Assessment, Columbia University

Authors or Affiliated Users: Klaus H. Jacob, Noah Edelblum, Jonathan Arnold

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: Preliminary Results for the Atlantic Coast

1999

One of three national assessments of U. S. coastal regions conducted in the late 1990's, this assessment focused on the Atlantic coastline, while the other two focused on the Gulf Coast and Pacific coastlines. The overall goal of these studies was to identify those portions of the U. S. coastal regions at risk and the nature of that risk (e. g. , inundation, erosion, etc. ). The long-term goal of this study is to predict future coastal changes with a degree of certainty useful for coastal management, following an approach similar to that used to map national seismic and volcanic hazards.

Related Organizations: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Authors or Affiliated Users: E. Robert Thieler, Erika S. Hammar-Klose

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Potential Climate Change Impacts on Marine Resources of the Northeastern United States

2007

This report synthesizes an assessment of potential changes in marine ecosystems off the northeastern United States in response to projected climate and emission scenarios, with a focus on temperature effects on living marine resources. It reviews likely impacts on the northeast continental shelf, and highlights potential effects on the distribution and abundance of the American lobster and Atlantic cod to illustrate the range of possible impacts throughout the region.

Related Organizations: Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment (NECIA)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Michael Fogarty, Lewis Incze, Richard Wahle, David Mountain, Allan Robinson, Andrew Pershing, Katherine Hayhoe, Anne Richards, James Manning

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Climate Change and the Future of Biodiversity in Washington

2007

This report, prepared for the State of Washington Biodiversity Council in 2007, provides an overview of recent and projected future climate impacts on the physical and biological systems of Washington. It also summarizes the state of knowledge about potential methods for addressing climate change in future planning efforts.

Related Organizations: University of Washington, State of Washington

Authors or Affiliated Users: Joshua J. Lawler, Molly Mathias

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Potential for Shoreline Changes Due to Sea-Level Rise Along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region

2007

In 2007, thirteen scientists convened for a two-day meeting to exchange  information and develop a consensus opinion on potential future coastal changes for the mid-Atlantic coast in response to sea-level rise. This 2007 report is the result of this workshop, providing an overview of how sea level rise could impact mid-Atlantic coast landforms, from New York to Virginia. Four different scenarios for sea level rise were considered and applied to specific areas of the Atlantic coast: a) the long-term sea-level rise rate observed over the 20th century would persist over the 21st century; b) the 20th century rate would increase by 2 mm/yr; c) the 20th century rate would increase by 7 mm/yr; and d) sea-level would rise by 2 m over the next few hundred years.

Related Organizations: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Benjamin T. Gutierrez, S. Jeffries Williams, E. Robert Thieler

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level (Chapter 5 of IPCC Working Group I Report: The Physical Science Basis)

2007

This chapter of the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC 4th Assessment Report provides detailed scientific analysis of observed changes in global ocean temperature and salinity, sea level, thermal expansion, water mass evolution and biogeochemical parameters.

Related Organizations: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Authors or Affiliated Users: S. Solomon, D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor, H.L. Miller

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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