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Recommended Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Delaware

December 2009

The Recommended Sea Level Rise Scenarios were established by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) Sea Level Rise (SLR) Technical Workgroup to     support the development of the DNREC Sea Level Rise Policy. The SLR Technical Workgroup is comprised of scientists from DNREC, University of Delaware, Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and the Center for the Inland Bays. The Workgroup determined the Delaware SLR scenarios by employing published expert summaries of existing data and predictions from national and international panels and federal agencies.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Town of Bowers Beach, Delaware Coastal Resiliency Planning

2009

With support from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), the Town of Bowers Beach is developing a Coastal Resiliency Action Plan to increase resiliency and reduce hazard vulnerability to the current and future effects of coastal storms and climate change.  Bowers Beach currently experiences a number of coastal related problems including flooding of streets, episodic storm damage, coastal erosion, and other coastal hazard impacts.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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State and Local Governments Plan for Development of Most Land Vulnerable to Rising Sea Level along the U.S. Atlantic Coast

October 27, 2009

Based on the analysis of planning data and current policies of 131 state and local land use plans from Massachusetts to Florida, the study identifies those coastal areas likely to be affected by rising water levels and classifies them based on the extent of development already in place and the potential for future development. The report explains that the existing extensive development on the Atlantic coast creates the need for coastal protective structures, which could negatively impact wetlands.

Authors or Affiliated Users: J.G. Titus, D.E. Hudgens, D.L. Trescott, M. Craghan, W.H. Nuckols, C.H. Hershner, J.M. Kassakian, C.J. Linn, P.G. Merritt, T.M. McCue, J.F. O'Connell, J. Tanski, J. Wang

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Executive Order 13508 - Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration

May 12, 2009

On May 12, 2009, President Barack Obama signed Executive Order 13508, recognizing the Chesapeake Bay as a national treasure and calling on the federal government to lead a renewed effort to restore and protect the nation’s largest estuary and its watershed.

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 4.1: Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region

January 2009

This report is one in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) produced between 2004 and 2009 by the U. S. Climate Change Science Program, aimed at providing current assessments of climate change science in the U. S. to inform public debate, policy, and operational decisions. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), collaborated on this report that discusses the impacts of sea-level rise on the physical characteristics of the coast, on coastal communities, and the habitats that depend on them in Mid-Atlantic coastal environments.

Authors or Affiliated Users: James G. Titus, K. Eric Anderson, Donald R. Cahoon, Dean B. Gesch, Stephen K. Gill, Benjamin T. Gutierrez, E. Robert Thieler, S. Jeffress Williams

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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The Potential Impacts of Global Sea Level Rise on Transportation Infrastructure

October 2008

Prepared by the U. S. Department of Transportation, this report provides a high-level estimate of the net effect of sea level-rise and storm surges to transportation infrastructure on the U. S. eastern seaboard by 2100. The study integrates estimates of eustatic sea-level rise based on IPCC scenarios and digital elevation maps to identify areas that will either be inundated or placed at risk during storms. These estimates do not account for local variations. Based on 9 modeling outputs, from 6cm to 59cm, the study identifies the roads, airports, ports, and rail lines at risk from New York down to Florida, and it provides quantitative data on the extent to which each state in the study area will be affected by sea-level rise.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kevin M. Wright, Christopher Hogan

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Climate Change and the Chesapeake Bay: State-of-the-Science Review and Recommendations

September 2008

This report from the Chesapeake Bay Program Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) addresses the current understanding of climate change impacts on the tidal Chesapeake Bay, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and research priorities. It is intended to provide the basis for incorporating climate change considerations into resource management decisions.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Christopher R. Pyke, Raymond Najjar, Mary Beth Adams, Denise Breitburg, Carl Hershner, Robert Howarth, Michael Kemp, Margaret Mulholland, Michael Paolisso, David Secor, Kevin Sellner, Denice Wardrop, Robert Wood

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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New Frameworks for Managing Dynamic Coasts: Legal and Policy Tools for Adapting U.S. Coastal Zone Management to Climate Change

June 2008

This paper, published in the Sea Grant Law and Policy Journal, identifies policy and governance reforms that could make coastal communities and ecosystems more resilient to the effects of sea level rise.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Sandra S. Nichols, Carl Bruch

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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Regional Impacts of Climate Change: Four Case Studies in the United States

December 2007

This report presents four case studies of climate change impacts in different regions of the country: The Heat is On: Climate Change & Heatwaves in the Midwest; The Importance of Climate Change for Future Wildfire Scenarios in the Western United States; Gulf Coast Wetland Sustainability in a Changing Climate; and Ramifications of Climate Change for Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia (also in the clearinghouse as individual entries). Each case study focuses on a specific type of impact of particular concern to a U.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kristie L. Ebi, Gerald A. Meehl, Dominique Bachelet, Robert R. Twilley, Donald F. Boesch

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Ramifications of Climate Change for Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

December 2007

This paper examines how both climate variability and potential climate change can affect hypoxia in the Chesapeake Bay and can present additional challenges to ongoing ecosystem restoration. It is one of four case studies in a report entitled, "Regional Impacts of Climate Change: Four Case Studies in the United States," that examines impacts of particular interest to different regions of the U. S. Past observations are used to elucidate the multiple influences of climate on hypoxia and its consequences to the Bay ecosystems.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Donald F. Boesch, Victoria J. Coles, David G. KimmelW. David Miller

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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