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Solar Works DC

May 18, 2017

In 2017, the District of Columbia’s Departments of Energy & Environment (DOEE) and Employment Services (DOES) partnered with GRID Alternatives Mid-Atlantic to start Solar Works DC, to implement a low-income solar installation program with a job training component. The purpose of the Program is to focus on training disadvantaged members of the D. C. community in solar installation, and provide low-income families with solar energy systems. Over a three-year period, more than 200 individuals have been trained in solar-related related industries.

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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Washington DC Green Zone Environmental Program

January 2016

The Green Zone Environmental Program (GZEP) is a program run by the District of Columbia’s Department of Energy and Environment that provides young adults aged 14 to 24 with summer careers in clean energy. Every year, over 300 youth and young adults throughout the District -- with a focus on recruitment from vulnerable, under-represented communities -- enroll in a six-week training and educational Program. The DOEE and GZEP partner with local businesses to expose participants of the Program to both classroom and hands-on training in the areas of stormwater management, solar energy installments, green infrastructure construction, landscaping, and more.

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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Patterns and Projections of High Tide Flooding Along the U.S. Coastline Using a Common Impact Threshold

February 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) analyzes "high tide flooding" (also known as "nuisance flooding") in this report, and finds that it is becoming more commonplace due to sea level rise. High tide flooding impacts roads, beaches, parks, and private property, and is generally more disruptive than damaging. However, there are places such as Norfolk, Virginia; San Diego, California; and the U. S Marshall islands where it is currently a serious problem. Even more, with continued sea level rise, flooding is likely to increase.

Authors or Affiliated Users: William Sweet, Greg Dusek, Jayantha Obeysekera, John Marra

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Metropolitan Washington Council of Government’s Environmental Justice Toolkit

July 27, 2017

Prepared by the Air and Climate Public Advisory Committee of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG), this toolkit provides an overview of environmental justice principles and outlines a series of approaches to better achieve environmental justice goals in the Washington, DC metro area. For each approach, the toolkit lists a number of additional resources that can be used to operationalize the recommendation.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Coastal Inundation Toolkit

The Coastal Inundation Toolkit was developed by the Digital Coast Partnership Group to help communities understand and address coastal inundation issues - where water covers what is normally dry land. Information and resources are organized into 5 stages: understanding coastal inundation, identifying community risks and vulnerabilities, creating inundation maps, communicating risks and vulnerability, and discovering what others are doing to address inundation. For each of these 5 areas, explanations and guidance are provided with links to the specific resources available from Digital Coast to support that specific step in the process, making this a user-friendly way to support assessments and planning for sea level rise and extreme weather events.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Resilience and Solar Assessment Tool - Washington D.C.

2017

In 2017, the District of Columbia’s Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) launched the country’s first resilience tool to identify opportunities for protecting residents in multifamily affordable housing from heat waves, flooding, and other climate change impacts. The city already faces a tight housing market with significant shortages in affordable housing. Climate change is expected to only exacerbate this pressure by increasing the cost of maintaining comfortable homes in the summer and protecting households from flooding. In order to help advance the goals of the city’s climate adaptation plan, DOEE worked with nonprofit partners to develop the Resilience and Solar Assessment Tool. The tool consists of a series of questionnaires that building owners can use to identify the building’s resilience to potential climate change impacts, examining characteristics like accessibility, emergency management plans, and electrical, mechanical, and plumbing equipment. Based on the outcome of the assessment, the tool provides additional recommendations for implementing resilience strategies at varying cost and scale. 

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Summary of Potential Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerabilities, and Adaptation Strategies in the Metropolitan Washington Region (Washington D.C.)

June 2013

Subtitled 'A synopsis of lessons learned from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments’ (COGs') climate adaptation planning initiatives from 2010 - 2012,' this report is intended to identify effects of climate change in the region, and encourage local resiliency planning. This is part of an ongoing project with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Sustainable Communities to create an EPA guidebook on smart growth and climate adaptation. The report summarizes key information that has been learned throughout the process of working with EPA, stakeholders and climate experts on the development of the guidebook.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Maia Davis, Amanda Campbell

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Applications in the Chesapeake Bay (External Review Draft)

June 2010

The goals of EPA’s Global Change Research Program (GCRP) are to assess the potential effects of climate change on water quality, air quality, ecosystem health, and human health, and to provide decision makers with information and tools that enable them to incorporate considerations of climate change into their decision making processes.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Susan H. Julius, Britta G. Bierwagen, Chris Pyke, J. Randall Freed, Susan Asam

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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State and Local Governments Plan for Development of Most Land Vulnerable to Rising Sea Level along the U.S. Atlantic Coast

October 27, 2009

Based on the analysis of planning data and current policies of 131 state and local land use plans from Massachusetts to Florida, the study identifies those coastal areas likely to be affected by rising water levels and classifies them based on the extent of development already in place and the potential for future development. The report explains that the existing extensive development on the Atlantic coast creates the need for coastal protective structures, which could negatively impact wetlands.

Authors or Affiliated Users: J.G. Titus, D.E. Hudgens, D.L. Trescott, M. Craghan, W.H. Nuckols, C.H. Hershner, J.M. Kassakian, C.J. Linn, P.G. Merritt, T.M. McCue, J.F. O'Connell, J. Tanski, J. Wang

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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The Potential Impacts of Global Sea Level Rise on Transportation Infrastructure

October 2008

Prepared by the U. S. Department of Transportation, this report provides a high-level estimate of the net effect of sea level-rise and storm surges to transportation infrastructure on the U. S. eastern seaboard by 2100. The study integrates estimates of eustatic sea-level rise based on IPCC scenarios and digital elevation maps to identify areas that will either be inundated or placed at risk during storms. These estimates do not account for local variations. Based on 9 modeling outputs, from 6cm to 59cm, the study identifies the roads, airports, ports, and rail lines at risk from New York down to Florida, and it provides quantitative data on the extent to which each state in the study area will be affected by sea-level rise.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kevin M. Wright, Christopher Hogan

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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