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Avoiding Septic Shock: How Climate Change can cause Septic System Failure and Whether New England States are Prepared

February 2017

This white paper discusses climate change impacts on septic systems in New England, and whether states in the region are prepared for these impacts. The paper provides a state-by-state analysis of septic system regulations in New England and discusses how these regulatory frameworks are not fully considering climate change impacts, especially groundwater table rise. It also identifies challenges in septic system regulation, and suggests recommendations and best practices for how states and municipalities can work to change laws, amend rules, or adopt new policies or incentives to better construct, manage, and regulate septic systems to be resilient to climate change.

Author or Affiliated User: Elena Mihaly

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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New England and Northern New York Forest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment and Synthesis: A Report from the New England Climate Change Response Framework Project

January 2018

Led by the U. S. Forest Service (USFS)’s Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science, this assessment evaluates the climate change vulnerability of forested ecosystems in the New England region (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, northern New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont). The report summarizes the current state of forests in the region including threats and management trends, describes climate impacts as they would progress under projected future climate scenarios, and relays the results of an extensive vulnerability assessment of the region’s forests.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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New Hampshire’s Climate Risk in the Seacoast (C-RiSe) Project

New Hampshire’s Department of Environmental Services administers the Climate Risk in the Seacoast (C-RiSe) project which is intended to provide municipalities along the Great Bay with the resources they need to assess sea level rise and storm surge flooding. The Great Bay communities that have been assessed include: Rollinsford, Dover, Madbury, Durham, Newmarket, Newfields, Exeter, Stratham, Greenland, and Newington. This project is funded through the Coastal Zone Management Act by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Changing Tides: How Sea-level Rise Harms Wildlife and Recreation Economies Along the U.S. Eastern Seaboard

August 15, 2016

From the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), “Changing Tides” delineates the risks of sea-level rise to wildlife, recreation, and local economies by outlining key impacts in 15 eastern U.S. states: Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. NWF also offers policy solutions for both mitigation and adaptation to climate change. 

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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New Hampshire Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission Final Report: Preparing New Hampshire for Projected Storm Surge, Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Precipitation

November 2016

The final report of the New Hampshire Coastal Risks and Hazards Commission details the growing climate risks from sea-level rise, flooding, storm surge, and extreme weather in coastal New Hampshire. The Commission also recommends policy measures for the the state's legislature, state agencies, and coastal municipalities to help reduce vulnerabilities.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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From Tides to Storms: Preparing for New Hampshire's Future Coast - Assessing Risk and Vulnerability of Coastal Communities to Sea-Level Rise and Storm Surge

September 2015

Developed by the Rockingham Planning Commission, the Tides to Storms project worked with 7 coastal communities in New Hampshire (Seabrook, Hampton Falls, Hampton, North Hampton, Rye, New Castle, Portsmouth) to assess their vulnerability to flooding from storm surge and sea-level rise. A regional vulnerability assessment was developed, as well as an assessment report and map set were prepared for each of the seven coastal municipalities. Each assessment considers risks to roadways and supporting transportation infrastructure, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural resources.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Climate Change and Human Health in New Hampshire: An Impact Assessment

May 2015

Prepared by the Sustainability Institute at the University of New Hampshire, this report provides an assessment of past and projected future climate change in New Hampshire, summarizes current knowledge on the health impacts of climate change, and outlines the potential climate-related human health impacts in New Hampshire in the coming decades.

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Trends in Extreme Precipitation Events for the Northeastern United States 1948-2007

March 2010

Based on the number and frequency of extreme precipitation events since the release of their 2005 report, entitled "Indicators of Climate Change in the Northeast," the authors sought to update information for this particular indicator in the Northeast, and apply more rigorous analysis to better enable local communities to take appropriate actions.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Patterns and Projections of High Tide Flooding Along the U.S. Coastline Using a Common Impact Threshold

February 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) analyzes "high tide flooding" (also known as "nuisance flooding") in this report, and finds that it is becoming more commonplace due to sea level rise. High tide flooding impacts roads, beaches, parks, and private property, and is generally more disruptive than damaging. However, there are places such as Norfolk, Virginia; San Diego, California; and the U. S Marshall islands where it is currently a serious problem. Even more, with continued sea level rise, flooding is likely to increase.

Authors or Affiliated Users: William Sweet, Greg Dusek, Jayantha Obeysekera, John Marra

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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New Hampshire Coastal Viewer

2015

The New Hampshire Coastal Viewer is an online mapping tool with coastal resources spatial data, hazards-related spatial data, and other spatial data sets for New Hampshire's 42 coastal watershed communities. Launched in 2015, this tool provides users the ability to access more than 150 spatial data sets, and to make and share their own customized maps.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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