Search Results

82 results

Filter by States Affected
Select states to filter this list

 

 

Resource

Potential for Shoreline Changes Due to Sea-Level Rise Along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region

2007

In 2007, thirteen scientists convened for a two-day meeting to exchange  information and develop a consensus opinion on potential future coastal changes for the mid-Atlantic coast in response to sea-level rise. This 2007 report is the result of this workshop, providing an overview of how sea level rise could impact mid-Atlantic coast landforms, from New York to Virginia. Four different scenarios for sea level rise were considered and applied to specific areas of the Atlantic coast: a) the long-term sea-level rise rate observed over the 20th century would persist over the 21st century; b) the 20th century rate would increase by 2 mm/yr; c) the 20th century rate would increase by 7 mm/yr; and d) sea-level would rise by 2 m over the next few hundred years.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Benjamin T. Gutierrez, S. Jeffries Williams, E. Robert Thieler

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Using Climate Forecasts for Drought Management

January 2006

This report synthesizes a 4-year study of the use of the climate forecasts for drought management in the state of Georgia. The study investigates the needs and potential benefits of seasonal forecast information for water management. It provides a method for translating NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) seasonal precipitation outlooks into a forecast precipitation index (FPI) that is tailored for water managers in the southeastern United States. This case study is also beneficial, as it represents the integration of climate forecasts into decision-making procedures for a public agency, and provides the economic valuation of that forecast information.

Author or Affiliated User: Anne C. Steinemann

Resource Category: Solutions

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

AgroClimate (SECC)

AgroClimate is an interactive website developed by the Southeast Climate Consortium (SECC) for use by farmers, ranchers, foresters, water resource managers, and those who advise them. The site uses crop simulation models and historic and forecast climate data to allow decision makers to compare changes in probable outcomes under different climate conditions.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: Preliminary Results for the Atlantic Coast

1999

One of three national assessments of U. S. coastal regions conducted in the late 1990's, this assessment focused on the Atlantic coastline, while the other two focused on the Gulf Coast and Pacific coastlines. The overall goal of these studies was to identify those portions of the U. S. coastal regions at risk and the nature of that risk (e. g. , inundation, erosion, etc. ). The long-term goal of this study is to predict future coastal changes with a degree of certainty useful for coastal management, following an approach similar to that used to map national seismic and volcanic hazards.

Authors or Affiliated Users: E. Robert Thieler, Erika S. Hammar-Klose

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Organization

Department of the Interior (DOI): South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC)

The South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) is one of 21 LCCs established by Secretarial Order No. 3289, which focus on on-the-ground strategic conservation efforts at the landscape level. LCCs are management-science partnerships that inform integrated resource-management actions addressing climate change and other stressors within and across landscapes.  

 

 

Organization

Department of the Interior (DOI): Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC)

One of 21 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) established by Secretarial Order No. 3289, which focus on on-the-ground strategic conservation efforts at the landscape level. LCCs are management-science partnerships that inform integrated resource-management actions addressing climate change and other stressors within and across landscapes, linking science and conservation. The currently participating bureaus are the National Park Service, Office of Surface Mining, and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

 

Organization

Institute for Coastal Science and Policy (East Carolina University)

The Institute for Coastal Science and Policy (ICSP) works to understand North Carolina coastal systems so that the problems and opportunities associated with them can be addressed. Research in the Institute concentrates on four main areas and their interrelationships including coastal ecology, coastal geoscience, social science, and public policy.   One objective of the Institute is to develop methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives that advance the understanding of the coastal environment and human systems, drawing on emerging technologies and conceptual tools such as systems and network theory, geographic information sciences, and computer-based modeling.

 

 

Organization

NOAA Office for Coastal Management

The Office for Coastal Management (OCM) is tasked with implementing the Coastal Zone Management Act. OCM activities include working with states and territories to conserve and protect coral reefs, operating a system of National Estuarine Research Reserves, and developing a system of marine protected areas.

 

 

Organization

North Carolina Sea Grant

North Carolina Sea Grant provides research, education and outreach opportunities relating to current issues affecting the North Carolina coast and its communities, and is a resource for scientists, educators, local officials, government agencies, coastal businesses and the public to find unbiased, scientifically sound information about the state's coastal ecosystems.   The program's initiatives and projects include a broad range of topics, including fisheries, seafood science and technology, water quality, aquaculture, community development, law and policy, and coastal hazards.

 

 

Organization

North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission

The Coastal Resources Commission, or CRC, was created when the General Assembly adopted the Coastal Area Management Act in 1974. The CRC establishes policies for the N. C. Coastal Management Program and adopts implementing rules for both CAMA and the N. C. Dredge and Fill Act. The commission designates areas of environmental concern, adopts rules and policies for coastal development within those areas, and certifies local land-use plans. .