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Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP)

December 13, 2010

The Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) was developed by the Department of Interior's (DOI) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC). This report defines proposed efforts by SERAP to better integrate and support efforts of the eight DOI NCCWSC Regional Climate Science Centers (RCSCs) and DOI's Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs), optimize ecosystem management decisions, and satisfy overall DOI conservation objectives.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Organization

Carolinas Integrative Sciences and Assessments (CISA) - RISA

CISA is a member of NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program, which supports climate research for decision-makers and policy planners at a regional level. CISA is committed to improving the range, quality, relevance, and accessibility of climate information for decision-making and resource management in North and South Carolina. CISA's initial research focus areas included water supply and quality modeling, and have more recently turned to climate impacts on public health and coastal communities.

 

 

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Town of Princeville, North Carolina: Princeville Community Floodprint: Resilience Strategies for Greater Princeville, North Carolina

September 2020

The Town of Princeville, North Carolina, located in the Tar River coastal floodplain along the U. S. eastern seaboard, has become increasingly vulnerable to extreme flooding. Princeville has endured multiple catastrophic flood events brought on by powerful Atlantic hurricanes, including Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Hurricane Matthew in 2016, which flooded approximately 80 percent of the town. Part of the residential community is in the process of relocating to higher ground with hazard mitigation funding support from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Resource Category: Planning

 

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City of Lumberton, North Carolina: Lumberton, North Carolina Community Floodprint

2019

The City of Lumberton is a small community in North Carolina built along the Lumber River. The river and its floodplains are an integral part of the landscape and Lumberton’s history and cultural and economic identity. Meanwhile, flooding has become more frequent and severe — requiring new adaptive flood mitigation solutions. In 2016, the community was devastated by Hurricane Matthew when the river flooded hundreds of homes and businesses. Just as the city was beginning to rebuild two years later, Hurricane Florence resulted in similar compounding damages.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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State of North Carolina: North Carolina Regions Innovating for Strong Economies and Environment (RISE)

May 19, 2022

Regions Innovating for Strong Economies and Environment (RISE) is a program created by the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resiliency (NCORR) and the North Carolina (NC) Rural Center. RISE supports resilience efforts in eastern North Carolina regions that have been impacted by recent storms. RISE promotes community-led resilience efforts, provides guidance to community members, builds local capacity, and brings leaders together to develop regional networks. RISE is funded by a U.S. Economic Development Administration grant and the Duke Energy Foundation. One initiative under the RISE program is Homegrown Leaders, which is a leadership and economic development training program created by the NC Rural Center. RISE and Homegrown Leaders are noteworthy examples of  regional-scale approaches to overcome local resource challenges and comprehensively address future economic development and equity in rural communities as a part of resilience initiatives. 

Resource Category: Organizations

 

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Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services, Flood Risk Assessment and Reduction Community Guidebook

April 6, 2021

The Flood Risk Assessment and Reduction Community Guidebook was developed as part of an initiative led by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services (CMSWS) of North Carolina, with support from the U. S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Flood Apex Program, to help communities nationwide to adapt to flooding. Based on years of developing the CMSWS flood mitigation program and tools, the Community Guidebook details the process of acquiring data to assess flood hazards and risk, and to evaluate and prioritize strategies to mitigate that risk.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services, Risk Assessment/Risk Reduction (RARR) Tool

June 16, 2022

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services (CMSWS) is a joint municipal–county stormwater utility that manages and maintains the regulated floodplains within Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, including the City of Charlotte. CMSWS has developed a system for assessing community flood risk through the Mecklenburg County Risk Assessment/Risk Reduction (RARR) Tool for comprehensive mapping, impact analysis, and county-wide floodplain management. This map-based application allows the agency to collect and analyze flood risk data to help identify and reduce flood risk at the parcel level and regionally. RARR is a data-driven framework and set of tools that dynamically assess, evaluate, and ultimately prioritize flood mitigation strategies. The flood risk analysis processes supported by the RARR tool, along with the resulting solutions that CMSWS offers as described in this case study and a companion report, can guide other local jurisdictions in flood resilience planning, and promote climate adaptive policies. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Asheville, North Carolina: Affordable Housing, Environmental, and Climate Resiliency Initiatives

June 16, 2022

In recent years, Asheville, North Carolina has faced population growth and affordable housing challenges compounded by climate change. Against this backdrop, Asheville also recognizes the importance of retaining its unique sense of place, culture, and character, including protecting trees and natural landscapes. As such, the city is working to ensure that it creates a healthy, livable community resilient to these and other impacts. Over the last two decades, Asheville has released several plans, assessments, and policies related to growing the city’s climate and environmental resilience and ensuring an adequate affordable housing stock. Accordingly, the city has pursued — and plans to continue pursuing — strategies that preserve the city’s culture and character while making the area a safer, more affordable place. Many of these strategies are facilitated through prioritizing the environment and affordable housing in different city plans and incentives-based amendments to zoning ordinances. Asheville serves as an example for other jurisdictions seeking to integrate climate and resilience elements within local governance structures, plans, and zoning ordinances while tackling other local challenges, such as maintaining or increasing affordable housing stock or retaining a distinct local culture. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home — City of Charlotte, North Carolina: Pilot Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing (NOAH) Subsidy Program

June 16, 2022

The City of Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the country, and where the price of housing has increased exponentially in recent years. Like many large urban centers, Charlotte faces challenges in meeting the demands for affordable and available housing. In 2020, the Charlotte City Council adopted the Pilot Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing (NOAH) Rental Subsidy Program (“Pilot NOAH Program”) to help preserve some of the city’s over 20,000 units of housing that are considered naturally affordable, i.e., without the assistance of government subsidies. Under the Pilot NOAH Program, the city provides financial assistance to private developers who agree to keep the units affordable rather than rebuild them or raise rent, which may lead to the displacement of current residents. Working in tandem with private investors who help subsidize the initial acquisition of NOAH properties, the Pilot NOAH Program has been created to help preserve the city’s affordable housing stock. The preservation of NOAH housing is one component of Charlotte’s broader strategy for preserving and creating affordable housing for low-and moderate-income residents, and can be illustrative for cities that seek to leverage additional public-private partnerships to improve housing affordability and availability in their jurisdictions. This case study is one of 24 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Collection of Lessons and Case Studies from Louisiana and Beyond

June 16, 2022

This report is composed of 24 individual case studies developed by Georgetown Climate Center to support, Greauxing Resilience at Home: A Regional Vision, a collaborative partnership effort with Capital Region Planning Commission in Louisiana. These case studies describe best and emerging practices, tools, and examples from Louisiana and other U.S. jurisdictions to make progress on the complex and interrelated challenges of housing, flooding, and resilience. These case studies are intended to provide transferable lessons and ideas for regional and local governments addressing housing and mitigating flood risk as integrated parts of comprehensive community resilience strategies. Collectively, these case studies present a suite, although not an exhaustive list of tools and approaches that can be used to facilitate any of these efforts.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Katie Spidalieri, Suhasini Ghosh, Katherine McCormick, Jennifer Li

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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