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NYC Municipal Water Efficiency Program: Timed Spray Showers

August 21, 2017

NYC Municipal Water Efficiency Program: Timed Spray Showers: The New York City Departments of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Parks and Recreation installed water-saving automatic shut-off timers and activation buttons on 400 spray showers at City playgrounds in order to conserve water by ensuring that showers are activated only when in use. The $3 million initiative, funded by DEP and jointly managed through a partnership with NYC Parks, is part of a larger citywide effort to reduce water consumption by 5 percent.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Nez Perce Tribe Clearwater River Subbasin Climate Change Adaptation Plan

December 30, 2011

The Nez Perce Tribe Water Resources Division (NPTWRD) developed this adaptation plan to increase awareness around climate change issues in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Home to the Nez Perce,  the Subbasin covers just over 9,000 square miles in Idaho that includes a mix of federal, state, tribal and privately-owned land. Historically hunter-gatherers, the Tribe’s connection to the land is reflected today through dependence on industries such as agriculture, timber production, and tourism and recreation.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Ken Clark, Jenifer Harris

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples: A Primer, Draft

May 2014

Prepared for the U. S. Secretary of the Interior Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science, this primer explores the relationship between climate change and Indigenous Peoples in the United States, specifically related to the impact of climate change on Indigenous Peoples, the interaction between the Federal Government and Indigenous Peoples, and federal funding available to Indigenous Peoples. This report also provides recommendations for how to better engage with tribal and indigenous people to support federal climate change initiatives.

Author or Affiliated User: Gary Morishima

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Climate Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Plan

August 2013

Located in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks to prepare for the broad-scale transformations to their homelands resulting from climate change. The goals of this adaptation plan include protecting and preserving cultural resources, ensuring continued economic growth, and promoting long-term community vitality. The plan begins by discussing observed changes, projections of future changes, and climate exposure across the following areas: increasing temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, sea level rise and coastal flooding, ocean acidification and temperature increases, forest habitat changes, and human health.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Chippewa of Lake Superior 1854 Ceded Territory Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Plan

September 13, 2016

In 1854, the Chippewa of Lake Superior entered into a treaty with the United States whereby the Chippewa ceded to the United States ownership of their lands in northeastern Minnesota. These lands are the so-called "1854 ceded territory. " Article 11 of the 1854 Treaty provides: ". . . And such of them as reside in the territory hereby ceded, shall have the right to hunt and fish therein, until otherwise ordered by the President. " The Chippewa of Lake Superior who reside in the ceded territory are the Fond du Lac, Grand Portage and Bois Forte Bands.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Tribal Climate Change Adaptation Options: A Review of the Scientific Literature

January 6, 2010

This report offers an overview of information from published scientific literature that identifies physical changes in the climate, and vulnerabilities of tribal resources to climate change. Adaptation approaches and strategies are described in response to these vulnerabilities, across ecosystems and other sectors such as agriculture, public health, and energy systems. While the paper is aimed at tribes in the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10, the Pacific Northwest, much of the material is generalized for all audiences.

Author or Affiliated User: Keith A. Rose

Resource Category: Planning

 

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ITEP Tribes and Climate Change Program

The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) Tribes and Climate Change Program provides support to tribes that are preparing for and currently contending with climate change including resources to develop climate change adaptation strategies. Development of the program is guided by an advisory committee that includes tribal environmental and natural resource professionals who are actively working on climate change issues. The program's online portal provides information on climate change impacts, adaptation planning, research, policy, guides and other educational tools, with a focus on the climate effects upon, and proactive involvement of, Native American tribes.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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The Effects of Climate Change on American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes

2008

This article discusses how the U. S. can do a better job of addressing tribes in climate policy, given the unique risks tribes face and unique legal structures that govern tribes.  As the safety, culture, and economies of many tribes are threatened long with the environment, the authors argue that the needs of tribes must be taken into account as the U. S. responds to climate change. The report outlines a number of questions that can help define the role of tribal governments in responding to climate change, and makes the case that tribes need to be at the table and makes suggestions of how tribes can better fit into the existing landscape, “both within the framework of federal law and through the exercise of tribal sovereignty.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Daniel Cordalis, Dean Suagee

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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New Mexico Climate Risk Map

June 17, 2021

On June 17, 2021, the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department’s (EMNRD) Energy Conservation and Management Division (ECMD) launched the New Mexico Climate Risk Map, a tool to provide state residents with information about how climate change may impact their community. The free online map allows communities and residents to search by address and provides dozens of data layers related to five climate hazards: air quality, drought, heat, flooding, and wildfire. The Climate Risk Map displays climate change impacts to better prepare communities for risk and inspire adaptive action.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Beyond Season's End: A Path Forward for Fish and Wildlife in the Era of Climate Change

2009

Beyond Seasons' End describes the impacts of climate change on fish, big game, upland birds, and waterfowl and how these species are responding to impacts. The report explains what can be done to protect fish and wildlife populations and sporting traditions under changing climate conditions, including case studies of successful adaptation and conservation projects. It presents a number of projects from fish and wildlife professionals about actions that the human community can take to assist the wild community adapting to climate change.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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