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Oregon Health Authority Climate Health Impact Assessments

2014

Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Oregon’s state public health agency, conducted three climate-focused Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) between 2011 and 2014 in order to determine the potential health benefits of greenhouse gas reduction projects. Requested by Metro Regional Government (Metro), Portland’s regional planning authority for transportation and land use, OHA’s HIA found that adopting the climate strategies proposed by Metro could reduce heart disease, stroke, and diabetes 2-4% by improving air quality and increasing active transportation. The HIAs also focused on the inequities of disease burden based on proximity to high volume roads, leading to increased injuries and respiratory disease, among other impacts; increasing active transportation and reducing the number of vehicles on the road could help to reduce this inequity. From the HIAs, OHA determined that implementing these strategies could also save over $100 million annually in health care costs. The 39-member Advisory Committee that helped shape and give feedback to the HIA included some community representatives and a representative from the Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Equity and Inclusion, but was primarily made up of local and regional government representatives. 

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Missouri Comprehensive State Energy Plan

October 2015

In October 2015, officials within the Missouri Department of Economic Development and the Division of Energy released the Comprehensive State Energy Plan, which outlined recommendations that would help the state transition to cleaner, more affordable, and more reliable energy. As a result of numerous public meetings and significant stakeholder participation, the agencies were able to divide their recommendations into five categories that would help Missouri achieve its energy goals: promoting efficiency of use; ensuring affordability; diversifying and promoting security in supply; undertaking regulatory improvements; and stimulating innovation, emerging technologies, and job creation. Compliance with these statewide recommendations will help to create new jobs, expand the economy, facilitate more efficient use of energy in all sectors, and help households more effectively manage their energy budgets – all in a more equitable manner. The Plan is a living document that serves as a resource for all elected officials, communities, businesses, and even individuals. In local, frontline communities especially, it is intended to serve as the basis for developing community-specific plans that not only emphasize its energy resources, but the priorities of the area. 

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Adapting to Climate Change Using Your Business Continuity Management System

2014

This report provides guidance to businesses on how to incorporate climate change preparedness into their business continuity management system (BCMS). A BCMS is a framework for adaptively responding to disruptive events or disasters, that may impact all areas of a business. Through business continuity management, organizations can identify and mitigate risks and minimize disruption to standard operations. The report identifies 13 tasks that businesses should undertake to integrate climate preparedness into their BCMS.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Weathering the Storm: Building Business Resilience to Climate Change

July 16, 2013

From the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), this report provides a detailed snapshot of the state of resilience planning among a cross-section of global companies, and outlines steps companies can take to better assess and manage their growing climate risks. The report includes a comprehensive review of resilience practices among S&P Global 100 Index companies and detailed case studies of six companies in diverse sectors: American Water, Bayer, The Hartford Group, National Grid, Rio Tinto and Weyerhaeuser.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Meg Crawford, Stephen Seidel

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Duke Energy Progress Partners with RETI for Community Solar

Duke Energy Progress (DEP) worked with the nonprofit, Renewable Energy Transition Initiative (RETI), to increase access to renewable energy programs for lower-income residents. This program provides an example of how utilities can use equity considerations to inform the deployment of renewable energy programs and resources. RETI works to eliminate high energy costs and make renewable energy solutions more accessible through educational programs, community outreach, research, advocacy, and partnerships. RETI promotes income-based applications and brings awareness to this energy saving program through engaging with communities at local community events and churches. DEP and RETI also launched The Shared Solar program for its residential and non-residential customers to be able to share in the economic benefits from a single solar facility. The cost savings from this community solar program are allocated to low-income customers in the company’s territory.

 

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Baltimore Shines - Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore Shines is a Baltimore City initiative that helps low-income residents access solar energy through either rooftop installations or community solar projects in Baltimore, Maryland. The program also expands workforce development opportunities in the solar installation industry. Baltimore Shines pilot projects were used to learn about barriers preventing solar installation in low-income communities and to inform the development of a sustainable financing model to increase access to solar energy. As the initial step to teaching energy affordability awareness, Baltimore Shines had community residents’ homes retrofitted by its close affiliate, Civic Works, which installed energy and water conservation equipment in homes. This program was not income restricted and is open to any Baltimore City homeowner or tenant residing in a house or apartment. Baltimore Shines also incorporated the development of workforce opportunities for underemployed and unemployed Baltimore residents through job-training and job placement. Additionally, Baltimore Shines leveraged a state funding program - the Maryland Community Solar Pilot program - that supported investments in renewable energy projects benefiting low- and moderate- income customers and encouraged private investment in the state’s solar industry with incentives for the investors. The program ultimately lowered bills, increased wages for some of the City’s low-income, under-employed or unemployed residents, and enhanced access to solar for many throughout the city. 

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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DC Public Service Commission MEDSIS Initiative, Customer Impact Working Group

2018

The District of Columbia Public Service Commission’s (DCPSC) establishment of the Customer Impact Working Group within the Modernizing the Energy Delivery System for Increased Sustainability (MEDSIS) initiative is a replicable example of how utility commissions are working to invite equitable input in grid modernization efforts. DCPSC initiated the MEDSIS initiative as a means of making the energy delivery system more sustainable, reliable, efficient, cost effective, and interactive for District customers. DCPSC approved the establishment of six working groups to elicit input from a diverse range of stakeholders in order to address key issues related to modernizing the District’s energy delivery system. The Customer Impact Working Group is examining how grid modernization efforts may impact various customers, including exploring questions of customer equity, data protection and privacy, consumer protection, and low- and limited-income customer inclusion. This Working Group will produce recommendations aimed at ensuring that all customers benefit from grid modernization efforts.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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California Public Utilities Commission Clean Energy Research Projects for Low-Income and Disadvantaged Communities

January 2018

The California Public Utilities Commission’s (CPUC) allocates its Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) to fund projects located in and benefiting low-income and disadvantaged communities, which is an example of utility commissions participating in equitable grid investment. EPIC funds come from rates charged to electricity customers of the state utilities and supports investments in clean energy technologies that benefit ratepayers of investor owned utilities. AB 523 directs the California Energy Commission (CEC) to expend at least 25 percent of its EPIC funds for Technology Demonstration and Deployment funding (TD&D) at sites located in, and benefiting, “disadvantaged communities,” and adds an additional requirement that the CEC expend at least 10 percent of its EPIC funds for TD&D at sites located in, and benefiting, low-income communities located in the state. The CPUC approved the allocation of $60 million of its EPIC funding to projects located in and benefiting low-income and disadvantaged communities that are also specifically prioritized for the investment of proceeds from CA’s cap-and-trade program. These investments are aimed at improving public health, quality of life, and economic opportunity in disadvantaged communities, which are defined by AB 523 as those most burdened by pollution from multiple sources and most vulnerable to its effects, considering socioeconomic characteristics and underlying health status.

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Chester, Pennsylvania Green Stormwater Infrastructure Plan and Community-Based Public-Private Partnership

June 2017

The City of Chester, Pennsylvania introduced the Chester City Green Stormwater Infrastructure Plan in 2017 as a means of addressing consistent stormwater pollution and overflow into the Delaware River, Chester Creek, and Ridley Creek watersheds. Chester’s combined sewer overflow (CSO) system often is overwhelmed during high rain and runoff events, which leads to increased flooding and water pollution and degradation of the river basin. The plan details Chester’s specific infrastructure needs, as well as the environmental and social benefits of green stormwater infrastructure (GSI). It also analyzes common GSI techniques including rain gardens, green roofs, stormwater planters, and porous pavements, and includes their typical cost. The plan then lists 20 potential sites within the City for GSI projects, guidance for first steps, suggestions for effective community engagement, and potential sources of both public and private funding. To fund the GSI projects, the City formed a community-based public-private partnership (CBP3), which is a different approach to financing stormwater management that expands on the traditional public-private partnership model by incorporating considerations of a community’s economic development needs. Coupled with its focus on green infrastructure as a primary means of stormwater management, this structure promotes not only improvements in water quality but in the community’s overall quality of life. The plan will also address equity through hiring local contractors for the infrastructure projects, training local workers to maintain projects, and creating new maintenance jobs for community members.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Solar Works DC

May 18, 2017

In 2017, the District of Columbia’s Departments of Energy & Environment (DOEE) and Employment Services (DOES) partnered with GRID Alternatives Mid-Atlantic to start Solar Works DC, to implement a low-income solar installation program with a job training component. The purpose of the Program is to focus on training disadvantaged members of the D. C. community in solar installation, and provide low-income families with solar energy systems. Over a three-year period, more than 200 individuals have been trained in solar-related related industries.

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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