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11th Street Bridge Equitable Development Plan, Washington D.C.

2015

The 11th Street Bridge Equitable Development Plan was developed in 2015 to address community development concerns around ongoing construction of the 11th Street Bridge Park, the city’s first elevated public park connecting Capitol Hill/Navy Yard in Northwest D.C. and the historic Anacostia/Fairlawn neighborhoods in Southeast D.C. – a project that has spurred concerns about investment-induced displacement and preserving the surrounding community’s environmental, economic, and cultural assets. The Equitable Development Plan proposes a cross-section of strategies to combat systemic inequities and displacement, including in housing, workforce development, small business development, and arts/culture. The plan, conducted in parallel with other local initiatives like the Douglass Community Land Trust, could help members of the community retain control of development and mitigate gentrification pressures, providing lessons across the city even as property owners and developers consider installing resilience upgrades and other investments to local housing stock.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Rebuild by Design: Hunts Point Lifelines - Transportation Elements

June 2014

The Hunts Point Lifelines proposal envisions the construction of pier infrastructure and a levee in the Bronx neighborhood of New York to expand intermodal transportation options and to provide flood protection.   The project proposal was one of six winners of the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Rebuild by Design Competition, a competition that was designed to inspire innovative climate-smart rebuilding projects in the disaster recovery effort after Hurricane Sandy.

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Prince George's County, Maryland - Clean Water Partnership Youth Engagement Program

January 2014

The Clean Water Partnership (CWP) was established in 2014 between Prince George’s County, Maryland, and a private company, Corvias, to retrofit 2,000 acres to facilitate better, more resilient stormwater management. A significant component of the CWP - which has been extended 30 more years and to 4,000 more acres - is educating the community on resilient infrastructure and environmental literacy. Much of this engagement and education centers around the youth of Prince George’s County. Several programs, including the Junior Achievement Finance Park and End Time Harvest Ministries, have established training, internship, and educational programs for students throughout the school district.

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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Chicago, Illinois Green Collar Jobs Initiative

October 2009

The Chicago Green Collar Jobs Initiative is a program that assists those seeking jobs in the Chicago metropolitan area ("Chicagoland"), with an emphasis on resilient and equitable employment. The Initiative is part of the Chicago Job Council's broader mission to create stable employment for frontline communities. Since its founding in 2002, the Initiative has focused their efforts on Chicagoland workers who have historically been left out of the labor market, and on educating disadvantaged job seekers.

Resource Category: Organizations

 

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Clean Energy Works Portland, Oregon

June 1, 2009

The City of Portland, Oregon Bureau of Planning and Sustainability pilot program - Clean Energy Works Portland - provides solar panel installation and energy efficiency upgrades to members of the Portland community. Clean Energy Works Portland’s primary focus is on employing workers coming from frontline populations, including people of color and women. This focus is enforced through a legally binding “Community Workforce Agreement” (CWA), requiring that of the hours worked in completion of the Program, at least 30% must have been completed by individuals that have historically been disadvantaged or underrepresented in the workforce, which includes people of color, women, and low-income individuals.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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RichmondBUILD Academy - City of Richmond, California

2007

RichmondBUILD is a public-private partnership initiative launched by the City of Richmond, California to train individuals on developing the necessary talent and skill to join careers in the renewable energy or construction industries. RichmondBUILD has focused its efforts on recruiting participants from low-income households throughout the community. Since its launch in 2007, a majority of graduates of the workforce training program have been minorities (90%), and it includes a large percentage of individuals who have a history with the justice system (30%).

Resource Category: Education and Outreach

 

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People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH Buffalo), New York

January 2001

People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH) Buffalo was founded in 2005 to serve as a resource to residents in Western New York communities to help provide affordable, resilient housing, create local hiring opportunities for underserved members of the community, and to “advance economic and environmental justice in Buffalo. ” Since its founding the non-profit has established a wide variety of programs that advance these goals, and provides employment opportunities statewide. The Hiring Hall program helps to staff PUSH Green with underemployed and underrepresented members of the Buffalo community - especially people of color and women - to train disadvantaged residents on a variety of different careers, with a focus on the green energy/technology field.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas — State of New Jersey: Blue Acres Buyout Program

July 15, 2020

The New Jersey Blue Acres Buyout Program is a nationally recognized example of a longstanding, state-run buyout program. Blue Acres works closely with municipalities throughout the state to identify privately owned properties that are routinely threatened or flooded due to sea-level rise and more frequent weather events. The program works directly with local governments to prioritize comprehensive buyouts of affected neighborhoods, instead of individual properties, and restores and protects the properties to maximize the flood and cost-reduction benefits for communities and the environment. To accomplish effective state-local coordination, the program has a diversified staff that meets local needs including case workers who work directly with participants in each buyout area, and a financial team that negotiates mortgage forgiveness with banks and other financial lenders on behalf of homeowners. As climate change worsens and makes extreme weather events more common, other states and local governments may increasingly evaluate the potential for buyouts, particularly in coastal jurisdictions. Decisionmakers could consider institutionalizing buyouts as a part of comprehensive climate adaptation and coastal and floodplain management strategies to encourage neighborhoods to relocate to safer, higher ground areas and restore ecosystems to attain flood, natural resources, and other community benefits.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas — Charlotte-Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: Floodplain Buyout Program

July 15, 2020

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services (CMSS) — a county-wide regional utility in North Carolina — has been administering a Floodplain Buyout Program to relocate vulnerable residents out of floodplains and reduce long-term flood damage. The buyout program is focused on risk reduction and flood mitigation best practices, where once bought out, properties are returned to open space uses to restore their natural beneficial flood retention and water quality improvement functions and provide other community amenities, like parks and trails. CMSS has purchased more than 400 flood-prone homes and businesses and enabled over 700 families and businesses to relocate to less vulnerable locations outside of the floodplain. CMSS has also supported a number of leaseback arrangements on a case-by-case basis with property owners to increase participation in the buyout program and reduce the county’s property maintenance costs. The program has been funded through a combination of federal and local government sources, with leasebacks also supporting the recapture of some costs. Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Floodplain Buyout Program is an example of a nationally recognized approach to supporting voluntary retreat in a riverine floodplain. Other local governments could consider adopting a comprehensive buyout program like Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s or individual program elements, like local funding options or leasebacks, to help support voluntary retreat decisions in coastal areas experiencing sea-level rise, impacts from disaster events, and land loss. This case study is one of 17 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas: Lessons and Tools from 17 Case Studies.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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New York City, ConEd Storm Hardening and Resiliency Collaborative

The Storm Hardening and Resiliency Joint Agreement demonstrates how community-based organizations can advocate for investments in grid resilience and ensure that investments are made without significant rate increases for low-income customers. Vulnerabilities and inequities in energy infrastructure were exposed following Superstorm Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, which caused significant impacts to New York City’s (NYC) energy system. To protect customers, the region, and energy systems from future natural disasters, Consolidated Edison, Inc. (ConEd) proposed a $1 billion capital investment for years 2013 through 2016 to mitigate impacts of future extreme weather, protect infrastructure, harden energy system components, and facilitate restoration. The utility organized a “Resiliency Collaborative” process to decide on how funds will be spent in their rate application filing. A collaboration of 12 parties including ConEd, NYC agency officials, and nonprofit and academic stakeholders resulted in a Joint Agreement between state Public Service Commission (PSC), ConEd, and other collaborative parties that froze electric rates for two years and required $1 billion in investment in storm hardening and resiliency. The multi-year rate plans ensure that delivery rates will not increase until after the rate plans have ended. The plan also offers rate mitigation for customers while assuring continued safe and reliable service. The agreement also provides for the expansion of the ConEd low-income discount programs to ConEd’s electric and gas businesses for the benefit of low income customers.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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