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Preparing for the Storm: Recommendations for Management of Risk from Coastal Hazards in Massachusetts

May 2007

Launched by the Romney Administration and the state legislature in 2006, the role of the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management's Coastal Hazards Commission (CHC) is to review existing coastal hazards practices and policies, identify data and information gaps, and make recommendations for administrative, regulatory, and statutory changes. The Commission released this report to summarize its findings after it reviewed coastal hazards associated with sea-level rise, hurricanes, northeasters and reduced sediment supply; moreover, it evaluated existing policies, potential knowledge gaps, and developed potential adaptation policies.

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Using Climate Forecasts for Drought Management

January 2006

This report synthesizes a 4-year study of the use of the climate forecasts for drought management in the state of Georgia. The study investigates the needs and potential benefits of seasonal forecast information for water management. It provides a method for translating NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) seasonal precipitation outlooks into a forecast precipitation index (FPI) that is tailored for water managers in the southeastern United States. This case study is also beneficial, as it represents the integration of climate forecasts into decision-making procedures for a public agency, and provides the economic valuation of that forecast information.

Author or Affiliated User: Anne C. Steinemann

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Healing Troubled Waters: Preparing Trout and Salmon Habitat for a Changing Climate

October 2007

Trout Unlimited's report, Healing Troubled Waters, explains how climate change will impact trout and salmon populations and the waters in which they live. Based on research by Trout Unlimited scientists, the report provides recommendations for what can be done to help fish and rivers withstand these changes.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Jack E. Williams, Amy L. Haak, Nathaniel G. Gillespie, Helen M. Neville, Warren T. Colyer

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Cool Surfaces and Shade Trees to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Air Quality in Urban Areas

2001

This article, published in Elsevier in 2002, outlines how cool surfaces (cool roofs and cool pavements) and urban trees can have a substantial effect on urban air temperature and, hence, can reduce cooling-energy use and smog. Using a dozen metropolitan cities as case studies, this paper demonstrates an estimate of about 20% of the national cooling demand can be avoided through a large-scale implementation of heat-island mitigation measures. This amounts to 40 TWh/ year savings, worth over $4B per year by 2015, in cooling-electricity savings alone.

Authors or Affiliated Users: H. Akbari, M. Pomerantz, H. Taha

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California Dept. of Fish and Game Climate Science Program

2008

The California Department of Fish and Game's (DFG’s) mission is 'to manage California’s diverse fish, wildlife, and plant resources, and the habitats upon which they depend, for their ecological values and their use and enjoyment by the public. ' The Climate Science Program was created in 2008 as part of the Climate Science and Renewable Energy Branch to help the Department address climate change, in support of this mission. The Program is designed to minimize the negative effects of climate change through the development of adaptation and mitigation measures, policies, and practices that provide clear benefits to the state’s fish, wildlife, and terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

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The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog, and Chicago: Local Features of the Problem and Solution

1999

This project identifies the effect that surface modifications have on the urban heat island phenomenon and related ozone problems in the metropolitan area of Chicago, Illinois.

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kimberly A. Gray, Mary E. Finster

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Pringle Creek (Salem, Oregon) Green Streets Initiative

2006

In 2006, the community of Pringle Creek, Oregon installed porous pavements on 100 percent of its streets, called its “Green Streets” iniative. The project combined a variety of green infrastructure techniques such as rain gardens and bioswales, with porous pavements to mitigate flooding of Pringle Creek streets during heavy precipitation events. The green infrastructure techniques used by the community are designed to return 90 percent of rainwater to the local aquifer, as opposed to flowing as runoff to community storm sewers.

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Oregon Guidance on Biofilters for Storm Water Discharge Pollution Removal

January 2003

In 2003, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) published guidance on the use of “biofilters” to remove pollution from stormwater. Biofilters include a variety of green infrastructure techniques installed along roadways to filter pollution from stormwater runoff such as constructed wetlands and bioswales (vegetated swales or ditches), among others. The guidance details the design best management practices (BMPs) that have been proven to work well in constructing biofilters, and argues that biofilters may be the “most economical” way to remove sediment and other pollutants from runoff.

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Washington D.C. Green Roof Program

2007

In 2003, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation initiated a green roof demonstration project funded under the terms of a consent decree negotiated by the D. C. Water and Sewer Authority. The money was used to issue grants for the installation of eight different pilot green roofs that would reduce the cost of each green roof cost to the building owner by up to 20 percent. The pilot roofs served as models that building owners could use for future green roof projects, by providing data on costs, construction methods, performance, and maintenance needs.

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Portland, Oregon Green Streets Program

2007

Portland, Oregon’s Green Streets are streets that use vegetated facilities to manage stormwater runoff. Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) Green Street Program is a sustainable stormwater strategy that meets regulatory compliance and resource protection goals by using a natural systems approach to manage stormwater, reduce flows, improve water quality and enhance watershed health.

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