• Resources for Small Communities

Funding Programs for Rural and Small Communities

This tab includes federal funding sources that have been used to support adaptation in rural and small communities and examples of how state and local governments are funding and financing rural and small community adaptation. This is not intended to be a list of all currently available grants supporting adaptation. 

Resources are automatically presented by date, but can also be sorted by rating and title. Apply additional filters to narrow by impact, state, region, jurisdictional focus, or funding source.

 

 

44 results are shown below.

Funding Source

 

 

Resource

DOT Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) Grant Program

2021

In April 2021, the Department of Transportation (DOT) rebooted its discretionary rail, transit, and port funding program as the Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) program. The program was initially known as the TIGER grant program, and most recently administered as the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) program. The FY 2021 funds will be available for obligation through September 30, 2024. The 2021 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFO) prioritizes projects that contemplate and address climate-related concerns such as energy efficiency, resilience, and emissions, requiring that climate and environmental justice impacts be considered by planners. Applications must be submitted by 5:00 PM Eastern on July 12, 2021. 

 

Related Organizations: U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)

Resource Category: Funding

 

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American Flood Coalition - Flood Funding Finder Tool

September 2020

Launched by the American Flood Coalition, the Flood Funding Finder (FFF) helps small communities identify federal programs that fund flood resilience efforts including flood mitigation and risk reduction projects, planning efforts, and more. To create the FFF, the Coalition analyzed hundreds of funding programs across 26 federal agencies to identify the programs most likely to assist small community efforts related to flooding and sea-level rise. 

Related Organizations: American Flood Coalition

Resource Category: Funding

 

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USDA NRCS Conservation Easement and Restoration Funding Programs

The U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) offers financial incentives and technical support through multiple programs to public and private landowners aiming to conserve wetlands, agricultural lands, grasslands, and forests through long-term easements. NRCS provides funding opportunities to acquire land for conservation in both a post-disaster and pre-disaster context. All NRCS programs are voluntary and allow working lands owners to be compensated for conserving their lands. These programs and easements can increase local resilience to climate change by improving water quality, reducing soil erosion, and enhancing wildlife habitat. Most USDA conservation funding is allocated through the Commodity Credit Corporation and authorized in Farm Bills (about $5.3 billion in Fiscal Year 2018), while other conservation programs - offering mostly technical assistance - are funded by discretionary spending and annual appropriations (about $1 billion annually). 

Related Organizations: Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Resource

Average Rating

Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas: Lessons and Tools from 17 Case Studies

July 15, 2020

This report, produced by the Georgetown Climate Center, features 17 case studies about how states, local governments, and communities across the country are approaching questions about managed retreat. Together, the case studies highlight how different types of legal and policy tools are being considered and implemented across a range of jurisdictions — from urban, suburban, and rural to riverine and coastal — to help support new and ongoing discussions on the subject. These case studies are intended to provide transferable lessons and potential management practices for coastal state and local policymakers evaluating managed retreat as one part of a strategy to adapt to climate change on the coast. The case studies in this report were informed by policymakers, practitioners, and community members leading, engaging in, or participating in the work presented in this report. This report was written to support Georgetown Climate Center’s Managed Retreat Toolkit, which also includes additional case study examples and a deeper exploration of specific legal and policy tools for use by state and local decisionmakers, climate adaptation practitioners, and planners.

Related Organizations: Georgetown Climate Center

Authors or Affiliated Users: Katie Spidalieri, Isabelle Smith

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Post-Disaster Community Investments in Lumberton Through the North Carolina State Acquisition and Relocation Fund for Buyout Relocation Assistance

2020

Lumberton, North Carolina provides one example of how state funding for relocation assistance can help support local buyouts and community investments in underserved areas. In 2016, the small community of Lumberton was devastated by Hurricane Matthew when the Lumber River flooded over 870 households, as well as a number of businesses. As the city was beginning to recover, only two years later, Lumberton was hit a second time by Hurricane Florence, resulting in damage to over 500 structures. As of 2019, Lumberton is seeking to leverage several grants and funding programs, including North Carolina’s State Acquisition and Relocation Fund (SARF), to rebuild the community and provide residents with relocation assistance to obtain new homes in Lumberton through a state-local partnership. Specifically, with funding from SARF, the local government is considering opportunities to invest in new homes in one existing, but underserved neighborhood of Lumberton that can offer safer homes for bought-out residents. As SARF and the ongoing work in Lumberton demonstrate, state and local governments can support voluntary, post-disaster transitions of people and minimize negative impacts to individuals, communities, and local tax bases from buyouts by reinvesting in underserved areas within their municipalities. 

Related Organizations: City of Lumberton, North Carolina, State of North Carolina

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project

The Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project (SERCAP) was established through funding from the U.S. Government’s Office of Economic Opportunity in the 1960s. The Project helps low-income rural communities in the mid-Atlantic and the Southeastern U.S. obtain water and wastewater infrastructure for running water, indoor plumbing, and wastewater treatment. Water utilities in these rural areas often lack funding to provide such infrastructure. Households that are not supplied with drinking water tend to rely on wells and septic tanks, which can get contaminated by pollution from agricultural activity and the lack of suitable wastewater treatment. SERCAP assists both individuals and municipalities, and its services include installing infrastructure, providing financing and loans, and offering technical support. In addition to providing services related to water, SERCAP also provides support on housing issues.

Resource Category: Organizations

 

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Average Rating

PG&E Better Together Resilient Communities Grant Program

March 1, 2018

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Better Together Resilient Communities grant program funds initiatives to help California communities better prepare for, withstand, and recover from extreme weather events and other risks related to climate change. PG&E is investing $2 million over five years in shareholder-funded grants.  In 2018, PG&E focused on projects to help communities prepare for increased frequency and severity of extreme heat events, and the 2019 Resilient Communities grant program focused on wildfire risk.

Related Organizations: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

Resource Category: Funding

 

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Southeast Sustainable Communities Fund

April 20, 2017

The Southeast Sustainable Communities Fund (SSCF) supports local communities in the southeastern United States to advance climate adaptation and social equity in local government policy, plans or programs. Grants have been awarded to City and County governments and local partnerships to create socially equitable sustainable energy and/or water initiatives. The fund invested $1. 5 million in 2017 for six projects, and has allocated nearly $1. 8 million in 2018 in support of six more sustainability projects in the Southeast that are addressing climate change impacts, to be implemented across 2019 - 2020.

Related Organizations: Southeast Sustainability Directors’ Network

Resource Category: Funding

 

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California Coastal Conservancy Climate Ready Grant Program

2014 - 2018

The California Coastal Conservancy’s Climate Ready program focuses on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, protecting coastal resources, and preparing communities along the California coast and within the San Francisco Bay for the current and future impacts of climate change. Climate Ready grants fund nature-based solutions for climate adaptation. These grants also seek to support projects located in and benefiting disadvantaged communities. The Coastal Conservancy has $3. 8 million available for the 5th round of funding in 2018.

Related Organizations: California State Coastal Conservancy

Resource Category: Funding

 

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DOT BUILD Grant Program

April 2018

In 2018 the U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT) replaced the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program with the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) transportation grant program. BUILD is a discretionary grant program that makes federal funding available on a competitive basis to surface transportation projects that meet "merit criteria. " Since 2009, DOT has provided $7. 1 billion in grants through this program to support 554 projects in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.

Related Organizations: U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)

Resource Category: Funding

 

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