• Transportation Resources

Transportation Sector Plans

This tab includes federal, state, and local plans that discuss adaptation options in the transportation sector.

Resources are automatically presented by rating, but can be sorted by date or title. Apply additional filters to narrow the list by plan type, impact, jurisdictional focus, state, or region.

 

 

249 results are shown below.

Plan Type

 

 

Resource

Maine's Climate Future: An Initial Assessment

April 2009

In late 2007, then Governor Baldacci asked the University of Maine and its Climate Change Institute to lead a preliminary analysis of the effects of climate change in Maine during the 21st century. This report from the analysis considers past climate change, recent evidence of accelerated rates of change, and the implications of continued climate change in Maine as a result of greenhouse gas emissions and their associated pollutants. The assessment highlights some of the critical climate impacts on various ecosystems and economic sectors in Maine, with the intention to help frame the policy and management discussions on adaptation that are needed, while emphasizing new opportunities that exist for the state.

Related Organizations: University of Maine, University of Maine Climate Change Institute, Maine Sea Grant

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Average Rating

The Potential Impacts of Global Sea Level Rise on Transportation Infrastructure

October 2008

Prepared by the U. S. Department of Transportation, this report provides a high-level estimate of the net effect of sea level-rise and storm surges to transportation infrastructure on the U. S. eastern seaboard by 2100. The study integrates estimates of eustatic sea-level rise based on IPCC scenarios and digital elevation maps to identify areas that will either be inundated or placed at risk during storms. These estimates do not account for local variations. Based on 9 modeling outputs, from 6cm to 59cm, the study identifies the roads, airports, ports, and rail lines at risk from New York down to Florida, and it provides quantitative data on the extent to which each state in the study area will be affected by sea-level rise.

Related Organizations: U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Climate Change Center and Environmental Forecasting, ICF International

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kevin M. Wright, Christopher Hogan

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

New York City’s MTA Adaptations to Climate Change – A Categorical Imperative

October 2008

New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) commissioned this report, “MTA Adaptations to Climate Change: A Categorical Imperative,” to provide a risk-based framework for adapting MTA facilities to climate change impacts.   The assessment covers the entire MTA region, which includes New York City, 12 counties in southeastern New York, and two counties in southwestern Connecticut. Specifically, the report identifies steps for completing a vulnerability assessment; develops climate change scenarios for the region; conducts an initial survey of key vulnerabilities of MTA assets and operations by agency and type of hazard; and offers recommendations for ways that the MTA can assess critical infrastructure, plan for, and implement climate change adaptation projects.

Related Organizations: New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), City of New York, New York

Authors or Affiliated Users: Klaus Jacob, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Radley Horton, David Major, Vivien Gornitz

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

California Climate Risk and Response

November 2008

This report provides a comprehensive examination of the economic impacts of climate change and adaptation in California. This multi-sector study from researchers at the University of California, Berkeley compiles the most recent available science on climate change impacts in the state, assesses the economic implications, and examines strategies for adaptation. 

Related Organizations: University of California, Berkeley

Authors or Affiliated Users: Michael McCormick, Fredrich Kahrl, David Roland-Holst

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Climate Risk Information (New York City)

February 17, 2009

This 2009 report ("the CRI") by the New York City Panel on Climate Change is designed to help New York City decision-makers better understand climate science and the potential consequences for city infrastructure. Mayor Bloomberg convened leading climate change experts to advise the City's Adaptation Force.  This report is one of three reports produced for the Task Force.  This report provides climate change projections for the and vulnerabilities to critical infrastructure

Related Organizations: New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), City of New York, New York

Authors or Affiliated Users: Radley Horton, Megan O'Grady

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

City of Chicago Analysis of Economic Impacts from Climate Change

April 15, 2008

The Chicago Climate Task Force was created to identify likely climate change scenarios for the city, identify key areas of focus based on economic impacts and the ability of the city to address them, and develop a specific set of adaptation options.

Related Organizations: Alliance for Resilient Cities, Oliver Wyman, City of Chicago, Illinois

Author or Affiliated User: Craig Faris

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Alaska Climate Impact Assessment Commission 2008 Final Report

March 17, 2008

In May 2006, the Alaska Legislature adopted House Concurrent Resolution 30, creating an Alaska Climate Impact Commission. The Commission was charged with assessing the impacts and costs of climate change to Alaska and developing recommendations for preventative measures potentially implemented by Alaskan communities and governments. The eleven-member commission released their final report in March 2008

Related Organizations: Joint Alaska Climate Impact Assessment Commission

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 4.7: Impacts of Climate Variability and Change on Transportation Systems and Infrastructure - Gulf Coast Study

March 2008

This report is one in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) produced between 2004 and 2009, aimed at providing current assessments of climate change science in the U. S. to inform public debate, policy, and operational decisions. This SAP investigates risks to transportation systems in the Gulf Coast from climate change, and assesses the steps managers and policy makers can take to ensure the safety and resilience of those transportation systems. The findings represent the first phase of a three phased research effort.

Related Organizations: U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Michael J. Savonis, Virginia R Burkett, Joanne R. Potter

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Corporate Risk Case Study: City of Chicago Climate Change Task Force

July 2008

This 2008 report, commissioned by the City of Chicago, models potential economic impacts of climate change for the city.  The study focused on city infrastructure, key departments, and budgets of the city of Chicago.  The analysis was designed to assist city leadership in adaptation and mitigation planning.

Related Organizations: City of Chicago, Illinois

Author or Affiliated User: Oliver Wyman

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Estimating Future Costs for Alaska Public Infrastructure at Risk from Climate Change

June 2007

The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska Anchorage created a model to estimate how much climate change could add to the costs of maintaining public infrastructure in Alaska in the near future (by 2030). This report describes how that model was developed, and presents preliminary estimates of additional public infrastructure costs resulting from climate change. The report concludes that a changing climate could make it 10 to 20 percent more expensive to build and maintain infrastructure, and that climate change induced damages could add $3.

Related Organizations: University of Alaska Anchorage, Institute of Social and Economic Research (University of Alaska-Anchorage)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Peter Larsen, Scott Goldsmith, Orson Smith, Meghan Wilson, Ken Strzepek, Paul Chinowsky, Ben Saylor

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List