• Coastal Resources

Coastal Sector Adaptation Strategies

This tab includes strategies for how to adapt to climate impacts in the coastal sector, including best practices and legal and policy analysis.

Resources are automatically presented by rating, but can be sorted by date or title. Apply additional filters to narrow the list by resource type, impact, jurisdictional focus, state, or region. 

 

 

140 results are shown below.

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Resource

Making California’s Coast Resilient to Sea-Level Rise: Principles for Aligned State Action

April 2020

Co-developed by numerous state and regional agencies, Making California’s Coast Resilient to Sea-Level Rise: Principles for Aligned State Action is an outline of six principles for coordinated planning and adaptation around sea-level rise (SLR) in the state of California. The principles call for all supporting agencies to adopt a minimum SLR estimate of 3.5 feet by 2050. This assumption aligns with concerns expressed in the 2009 California Climate Adaptation Strategy that SLR will occur more quickly and severely than had originally been anticipated (new estimates anticipate California’s SLR reaching 7 feet or more by 2100). The principles include goals and objectives for agencies to implement resilience projects; use high-quality science; build resilience-based partnerships and communication networks; align policies across agencies; and support local resilience efforts. The guidelines aim to ensure that all of the state’s management, decisionmaking, and regulatory activities are “guided by a common, clear, and fundamental vision” to increase California’s coastal resilience and better adapt and prepare for climate change impacts.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas — Punta Gorda, Florida: Climate Adaptation and Comprehensive Plans and Updates

July 15, 2020

The harborside city of Punta Gorda, Florida has responded to the threat of coastal storms and climate change impacts with two different plans - a Climate Adaptation Plan and a local comprehensive plan - to promote, manage, and protect the city’s natural resources and plan for development in a way that minimizes risks to people and property and conserves ecosystems. The Adaptation Plan is unique because it was developed through a “citizen-driven process” designed to identify effective local responses to climate change and includes a variety of adaptation options that enjoy broad community support, including managed retreat or “planned relocation.” The city incorporated the Climate Adaptation Plan into its comprehensive plan to ensure that climate change is considered in land-use decisionmaking efforts. In 2019, the city released an update to its Adaptation Plan that identifies the city’s progress to date and future adaptation actions the city could consider implementing. Punta Gorda provides a useful example of how effective community engagement can enhance adaptation planning and build community support for managed retreat strategies and how adaptation plans can be used to inform future land-use decisions to ensure safer, more resilient development. This case study is one of 17 case studies featured in a report written by the Georgetown Climate Center, Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas: Lessons and Tools from 17 Case Studies.

 

Resource Category: Planning

 

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Building Resilience to Coastal Hazards and Climate Change in Hawaii

April 2019

From May 2016 until April 2019, the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources and the Office of Planning partnered with the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program to create three tools that support adaptation at the local level: an interactive data mapthe Hawaii Sea-Level Rise Viewer, and two guidance documentsIntegrating Coastal Hazards and Sea-Level Rise Resilience in Community Planning and Guidance for Disaster Recovery Preparedness in Hawaii. Much of Hawaii’s population and development exist on low-lying coastal plains that are vulnerable to erosion, flooding, and inundation. Building on the state’s 2017 Hawaii Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation Report, the complementary tools are aimed at helping communities better prepare for future sea-level rise and other climate change impacts.

Resource Category: Data and tools

 

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Financing resilient communities and coastlines: How environmental impact bonds can accelerate wetland restoration in Louisiana and beyond

August 20, 2018

The Environmental Defense Fund and Quantified Ventures have assessed how an environmental impact bond (EIB) could effectively be used for coastal resilience financing for wetland restoration in Louisiana and other coastal areas. The report outlines the steps Louisiana would take to pilot and implement the EIB to restore the coast and wetlands, while greatly reducing land loss to sea level rise, and incentivizing investment. The framework could also support financing other natural infrastructure projects that build coastal resiliency, and serves as a template for coastal investments anywhere.

Related Organizations: Environmental Defense Fund

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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Managing the Retreat from Rising Seas — State of New Jersey: Blue Acres Buyout Program

July 15, 2020

The New Jersey Blue Acres Buyout Program is a nationally recognized example of a longstanding, state-run buyout program. Blue Acres works closely with municipalities throughout the state to identify privately owned properties that are routinely threatened or flooded due to sea-level rise and more frequent weather events. The program works directly with local governments to prioritize comprehensive buyouts of affected neighborhoods, instead of individual properties, and restores and protects the properties to maximize the flood and cost-reduction benefits for communities and the environment. To accomplish effective state-local coordination, the program has a diversified staff that meets local needs including case workers who work directly with participants in each buyout area, and a financial team that negotiates mortgage forgiveness with banks and other financial lenders on behalf of homeowners. As climate change worsens and makes extreme weather events more common, other states and local governments may increasingly evaluate the potential for buyouts, particularly in coastal jurisdictions. Decisionmakers could consider institutionalizing buyouts as a part of comprehensive climate adaptation and coastal and floodplain management strategies to encourage neighborhoods to relocate to safer, higher ground areas and restore ecosystems to attain flood, natural resources, and other community benefits.

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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The Cathedral Engulfed: Sea-level Rise, Property Rights, and Time

2012

Sea-level rise will require many new initiatives in land use regulation to adapt to unprecedented climate conditions. Such government actions will prompt regulatory and other takings claims, and also will be shaped by apprehension of such claims.

Related Organizations: Georgetown Law

Author or Affiliated User: J. Peter Byrne

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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An Adaptation Portfolio for the United States Coastal and Marine Environment

June 2009

This report presents a suite of federal, state and local policy actions to enhance the resilience of human and natural systems to the effects of climate change and variability for marine and coastal environments. Strategies discussed include: investments in habitat restoration, permitting decisions under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, the purchase of coastal lands, controls for reducing non-point and point source pollution upstream of intertidal estuaries, the inspection and prevention of invasive species, marine protected areas (MPAs), incentive‐based fishery management policies, and in general a better definition of rights to marine and coastal resources that creates stewardship incentives.

Related Organizations: Resources for the Future (RFF)

Authors or Affiliated Users: David Kling, James N. Sanchirico

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Recommendations to the Secure Commonwealth Panel on the Issue of Sea Level Rise and Recurrent Flooding in Coastal Virginia

September 5, 2014

From the Recurrent Flooding Sub-Panel of Virginia’s Secure Commonwealth Panel, this draft report provides recommendations on actions Virginia can take to prepare for sea level rise and increased flooding as caused by climate change. This comprehensive report also offers analysis of which tools, authorities, initiatives and resources already exist, what actions can be taken, and how to coordinate it all into a united effort to adapt to these impacts.

Related Organizations: Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) Center for Coastal Resources Management, Virginia Secure Commonwealth Panel

Resource Category: Law and Governance

 

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North Carolina's Coasts in Crisis: A Vision for the Future

October 2008

This report, prepared by two groups at East Carolina University, describes the risks that sea level rise poses for the North Carolina Coast.

Related Organizations: East Carolina University Department of Geologic Sciences, Institute for Coastal Science and Policy (East Carolina University)

Authors or Affiliated Users: S.R. Riggs, S.J. Culver, D.V. Ames, D.J. Mallison, P.R. Corbett, J.P. Walsh

Resource Category: Assessments

 

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Better-Defined Rights and Responsibilities in Marine Adaptation Policy

December 2009

This issue brief discusses key elements of marine environment adaptation policy, including rights, resources, and governance. The brief recommends establishing better-defined rights and responsibilities for commercial and recreational fisheries in order to create an adaptation portfolio for marine and coastal resources. In addition, the report suggests establishing a broader ocean governance framework that includes comprehensive planning, allocation of dominant use zones and user rights within zones, and ecological standards.

Related Organizations: Resources for the Future (RFF)

Author or Affiliated User: James N. Sanchirico

Resource Category: Solutions

 

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