Search Results

40 results

Filter by Impacts
Filter results to only show resources that are focused on selected impacts.

 

 

Resource

Scorched: Extreme Heat and Real Estate

August 2019

Extreme heat is an increasingly severe climate change impact across the United States - to the environment and natural resources, public health, infrastructure and ultimately, the economy.  Scorched provides an overview of extreme heat’s implications on the built environment and current and future real estate markets. Heat mitigation and adaptation strategies are discussed related to building design, building materials, green infrastructure and public space design. Case studies highlight the how the real estate sector is leading in implementing ‘heat-resilient’ building designs and land uses.

Related Organizations: Urban Land Institute

Authors or Affiliated Users: Katharine Burgess, Elizabeth Foster

Resource Category: Solutions

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Killer Heat in the United States

July 2019

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) has evaluated how climate change will contribute to increasing incidence of dangerous high heat days across the U. S. This includes an analysis of the growing number of high heat days across various regions of the country, described under three climate change scenarios. The report also details the public health consequences of extreme heat and the populations that are particularly vulnerable to these threats. Policy recommendations are offered with adaptation measures that can be implemented at all levels of government to address rising temperatures.

Related Organizations: Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS)

Authors or Affiliated Users: Kristina Dahl, Erika Spanger-Siegfried, Rachel Licker, Astrid Caldas, John Abatzoglou, Nicholas Mailloux, Rachel Cleetus, Shana Udvardy, Juan Declet-Barreto, Pamela Worth

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

California Heat Assessment Tool (CHAT)

2019

The California Heat Assessment Tool (CHAT) was developed to help state and local public health officials understand how heat vulnerability will change with increasing temperatures due to climate change. The tool helps users identify heat vulnerable areas based upon changes in high heat days under different climate scenarios and social, health and environmental vulnerability factors. The study defines "Heat Health Events" (HHEs) as heat events that cause negative public health impacts - and the study found that vulnerable groups may be more sensitive to high-heat days by as much as 6 to 8 degrees Fahrenheit as compared to the general population.

Related Organizations: California Natural Resources Agency, Four Twenty Seven

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

NYSERDA - Population Vulnerability to Climate Change in New York State

October 2017

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) identified current and future vulnerability to extreme heat across New York State, focusing on community and individual health risk factors.  A heat-vulnerability index was developed, and a heat-health impact assessment was conducted using ClimAID climate projections.  The study included an assessment of the adequacy and accessibility of cooling centers, and the public’s awareness of cooling centers and heat warning systems or adaptation resources across New York.

Related Organizations: New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Cool Neighborhoods NYC

June 14, 2017

New York City Mayor de Blasio launched Cool Neighborhoods NYC in June 2017. This $106 million program is designed to minimize the effects of extreme heat on the city by implementing projects such as cool roofs, city-wide tree plantings, and climate risk training for home health aides, among others.   The comprehensive resilience program aims to reduce heat-related health impacts by lowering temperatures in heat-vulnerable neighborhoods and strengthening social networks as well. Cool Neighborhoods NYC is led by the Mayor’s Office of Recovery & Resiliency and will be implemented in partnerships with NYC Parks, the Health Department, Small Business Services, Emergency Management, and members of the private sector.

Related Organizations: City of New York, New York

Resource Category: Solutions

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Case Study: Scottsdale, Arizona’s Cool Roofs Workshop

February 23, 2017

In 2015, the City of Scottsdale, Arizona hosted a Cool Roof workshop series, to promote the use of cool roofs as a strategy for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings and reducing urban heat islands.  Cool roofs are designed to reflect sunlight and heat away from a building, reducing roof temperatures and urban heat islands. Cool roofs also reduce energy use, ambient air temperature, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and improve human health and comfort. [ref title=""]US Environmental Protection Agency, Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Heat Islands, available at https://www.

Related Organizations: Scottsdale, Arizona

Resource Category: Solutions

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Average Rating

Case Study: Harlem Heat Project

February 23, 2017

The Harlem Heat Project is a community-based initiative that began in New York City in the summer of 2016. It combines crowd-sourcing, data reporting, and narrative journalism to tell the story or urban heat islands in New York City. Non-profit journalism and community-based organizations came together to provide low-cost heat sensors to homeowners in "heat-vulnerable" areas of Harlem in New York City. The data was used to tell the story of disproportionate risks to extreme heat for lower-income and communities of color as a result of increasing temperatures from climate change.

Related Organizations: WE ACT for Environmental Justice, AdaptNY, I See Change

Resource Category: Solutions

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Average Rating

Achieving Urban Resilience: Washington D.C.

December 12, 2016

Achieving Urban Resilience illustrates the environmental, health and economic benefits that Washington, D. C. could gain from citywide adoption of smart surface technologies such as cool roofs, green roofs, solar PV, porous pavements, bio-retention, rainwater harvesting, reflective pavements, permeable pavements, and urban trees. The report quantifies the benefits of adopting cost-effective strategies to manage sun and rainfall at a city level, and documents how the District could save at least $5 billion over 40 years with smart surface strategies.

Related Organizations: District Department of Energy and the Environment (DDOE) - Washington DC, District Department of General Services - Washington DC, Capital E

Authors or Affiliated Users: Greg Kats, Keith Glassbrook

Resource Category: Planning

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Louisville Urban Heat Management Study

April 2016

The Louisville, Kentucky Urban Heat Management Study assesses the degree to which the Louisville Metro area is warming as a result of urban development and deforestation. The first of its kind by a major U.S. city, this report educates neighborhood and city decision makers on the impacts that rising temperatures have on public health, and provides recommendations for addressing Louisville’s urban heat problem.

Related Organizations: City of Louisville, Kentucky

Resource Category: Assessments

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List

 

Resource

Seattle Extreme Heat Scenario-Based Pilot-Project in Frontline Communities - Racial Equity Mini Evaluation

December 2015

The Seattle, Washington Extreme Heat Scenario-Based Pilot-Project was commissioned by the City of Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment, funded in part by the Urban Sustainability Directors Network, and conducted by Equity Matters. It was commissioned as a pilot program to understand how municipal agencies, including Public Health - Seattle and King County, and the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency, can better support low-income communities and communities of color during extreme heat events.

Related Organizations: Equity Matters, City of Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment, Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN)

Resource Category: Planning

 

See Resource Login to Add to My Resource List